Jump to content

The Protestant Community

Christian and Theologically Protestant? Or, sincerely inquiring about the Protestant faith? Welcome to Christforums the Christian Protestant community. You'll first need to register in order to join our community. Create or respond to threads on your favorite topics and subjects. Registration takes less than a minute, it's simple, fast, and free! Enjoy the fellowship! God bless, Christforums' Staff
Register now

Fenced Community

Christforums is a Protestant Christian forum, open to Bible- believing Christians such as Presbyterians, Lutherans, Reformed, Baptists, Church of Christ members, Pentecostals, Anglicans. Methodists, Charismatics, or any other conservative, Nicene- derived Christian Church. We do not solicit cultists of any kind, including Mormons, Jehovah's Witnesses, Eastern Lightning, Falun Gong, Unification Church, Aum Shinrikyo, Christian Scientists or any other non- Nicene, non- Biblical heresy.
Register now

Christian Fellowship

John Calvin puts forward a very simple reason why love is the greatest gift: “Because faith and hope are our own: love is diffused among others.” In other words, faith and hope benefit the possessor, but love always benefits another. In John 13:34–35 Jesus says, “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” Love always requires an “other” as an object; love cannot remain within itself, and that is part of what makes love the greatest gift.
ConfessionalLutheran

What is a Non Denominational Christian?

Recommended Posts

What is a Non- Denominational Christian? What do they believe? Are they Calvinists, Arminians, neither or both? How do they arrive at their theology?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess I can only speak for myself in this regard. I grew up attending a Lutheran Church, but now I simply consider myself a Christian. I came to a place in my faith where I did not want to take the name of any man or organization.

 

As for the whole Calvinist vs. Arminian issue, I'm neither. There are points of both views that I disagree with.

 

Just Christian.

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I guess I can only speak for myself in this regard. I grew up attending a Lutheran Church, but now I simply consider myself a Christian. I came to a place in my faith where I did not want to take the name of any man or organization.

 

As for the whole Calvinist vs. Arminian issue, I'm neither. There are points of both views that I disagree with.

 

Just Christian.

 

A very clear answer. Thank you and may God continue to bless you in your walk!

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

A very clear answer. Thank you and may God continue to bless you in your walk!

 

God bless you too. :)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What is a Non- Denominational Christian? What do they believe? Are they Calvinists, Arminians, neither or both? How do they arrive at their theology?

 

As you probably know, Calvinism is not a denomination but the name of a theological works pertaining to soteriology.

 

I was a little over six years involved in a non-denominational church that would define non-denominationalism as a body that does not believe in emphasizing any doctrine in order to not cause a division within the body of Christ.

 

Typically, non-denominational "movements" like Calvary Chapel teach through verse by verse expositions. Because of their heavy emphasis, on Scripture, (though they are anti-reformed) many come out of Calvary to pursue the Reformed faith. I believe the emphasis on Scripture leads most to the foundational Protestant pillar - Sola Scriptura. For me, in my life, Calvary was a stepping stone church.

 

God bless,

William

  • Like 4
  • Best Answer 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

As you probably know, Calvinism is not a denomination but the name of a theological works pertaining to soteriology.

 

I was a little over six years involved in a non-denominational church that would define non-denominationalism as a body that does not believe in emphasizing any doctrine in order to not cause a division within the body of Christ.

 

Typically, non-denominational "movements" like Calvary Chapel teach through verse by verse expositions. Because of their heavy emphasis, on Scripture, ( though they are anti-reformed) many come out of Calvary to pursue the Reformed faith. I believe the emphasis on Scripture leads most to the foundational Protestant pillar - Sola Scriptura. For me, in my life, Calvary was a stepping stone church.

 

God bless,

William

 

Very interesting. Stepping- stone churches can be quite useful in one's spiritual walk. I had two of them, that led me to the Lutheran Church- Missouri Synod. The first was the church I was raised in, a Southern Baptist Church, then the church I spent my college years and much of my adult life in, the Roman Catholic Church, then, after I saw the insufficiencies of both, after due prayer and study, four years ago last February, I was received into the Lutheran Church- Missouri Synod. This is my spiritual home, although it took most of my life to find my way here. The Body of Christ has had divisions since the early centuries, though and will be totally reunited once Jesus Christ returns to Earth to set up His Kingdom.

 

So, back to topic, Non- Denominational Christians have no denominational affiliation because they want to strive for unity and part of doing that means surrendering any denominational labels, such as Lutherans, Anglicans, Christian Reformed, Orthodox Presbyterians, Wesleyans, etc.?

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Very interesting. Stepping- stone churches can be quite useful in one's spiritual walk. I had two of them, that led me to the Lutheran Church- Missouri Synod. The first was the church I was raised in, a Southern Baptist Church, then the church I spent my college years and much of my adult life in, the Roman Catholic Church, then, after I saw the insufficiencies of both, after due prayer and study, four years ago last February, I was received into the Lutheran Church- Missouri Synod. This is my spiritual home, although it took most of my life to find my way here. The Body of Christ has had divisions since the early centuries, though and will be totally reunited once Jesus Christ returns to Earth to set up His Kingdom.

 

I remember last Feb, and your inquiry on the Baptist church.

 

I was received into the Orthodox Presbyterian Church now three years ago. The irony is, I asked my then pastor at Calvary whether he was a Calvinist because of certain things that kept ringing true. Basically, he put me off saying he did not debate or argue over these theological systems and then referred me to a book called, The Dark Side of Calvinism. Later, I learned that Calvary was anti-reformed and Calvary Chapel was notorious for ousting Calvinist from the ministry. I realized later the reason why my pastor, bless his heart, sounded like a Calvinist at times was because he properly exegeted the Scriptures. :RpS_thumbup:

 

I began life in the Presbyterian church being baptized by my baby sitter's church on a Sunday at the age of 5. A year or so later never stepped into a church again until I was enrolled in a Private Catholic school that required one hour of Catholic Religion a day. Joined the military and never stepped into a church again until my late twenties. There I found a home at Calvary, and then met my wife. I moved and began attending an Evangelical church (credo-baptist) for about a year. Tried Calvary again, and then stumbled on that conversation with the Calvary pastor.

 

I love the Reformed faith, and have much respect for the Presbyterian style of church government. I feel pretty comfortable now in my theology which is: 5 Solas, Calvinism, Covenant Theology, Amillennialism, and Cessationism.

 

As for my wife, I remember her break through day as we sat listening to a documentary on the history of Calvinism which covered the most pivotal arguments and debates in Church history. She excitedly screams, that's what you have been trying to teach me for months! She joined the Reformed Presbyterian church with me. As for me, my break through moment was while reading John Calvin on the Sovereignty of God. I must of cried for three hours after reading that particular work. It was monergism that opened my eyes.

 

God bless,

William

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I remember last Feb, and your inquiry on the Baptist church.

 

I was received into the Orthodox Presbyterian Church now three years ago. The irony is, I asked my then pastor at Calvary whether he was a Calvinist because of certain things that kept ringing true. Basically, he put me off saying he did not debate or argue over these theological systems and then referred me to a book called, The Dark Side of Calvinism. Later, I learned that Calvary was anti-reformed and Calvary Chapel was notorious for ousting Calvinist from the ministry. I realized later the reason why my pastor, bless his heart, sounded like a Calvinist at times was because he properly exegeted the Scriptures. :RpS_thumbup:

 

I began life in the Presbyterian church being baptized by my baby sitter's church on a Sunday at the age of 5. A year or so later never stepped into a church again until I was enrolled in a Private Catholic school that required one hour of Catholic Religion a day. Joined the military and never stepped into the church again until my late twenties. There I found a home at Calvary, and then met my wife. I moved and began attending an Evangelical church (credo-baptist) for about a year. Tried Calvary again, and then stumbled on that conversation with the Calvary pastor.

 

I love the Reformed faith, and have much respect for the Presbyterian style of church government. I feel pretty comfortable now in my theology which is: Calvinism, Covenant Theology, Amillennialism, and Cessationism.

 

God bless,

William

 

Awesome, William. :RpS_thumbup:

God bless you, too.

The Peace of the Lord be with you always.

Andrew

 

Post Scriptum

 

Yeah, that lasted one service. The Baptist set up had become pretty foreign as to what I was used to and my motivation to switch over because some other member's kid ( in my LCMS congregation) didn't like me was pretty foolish in retrospect. You can't please everybody. I do love the Confessionalism, the Biblical stance, the Liturgy, the fellowship and the community of the Lutheran Church- Missouri Synod.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I do love the Confessionalism, the Biblical stance, the Liturgy, the fellowship and the community of the Lutheran Church- Missouri Synod.

 

One thing I think about the Missouri Synod like the Orthodox Presbyterian church and its emphasis on Confessions is that we really do not need to worry about her future as long as there are those with that Reformed spirit which vow to uphold the Church's creeds and confessions.

 

God bless,

William

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What is a Non- Denominational Christian? What do they believe? Are they Calvinists, Arminians, neither or both? How do they arrive at their theology?

 

Hi Andrew, as you've probably already figured out, there are any number of different types of non-denominational churches, including ones that are Arminian, mixed, or Calvinist. Here's the website of my favorite non-denominational pastor's broadcast ministry: www.gty.org in case you're interested in hearing one of the more Calvinist-oriented non-denominational preachers (Dr. John MacArthur). Oh, and here's his church's website: https://www.gracechurch.org/?AspxAut...ookieSupport=1

 

On forums like this one, "Non-Denominational" can also mean at least a couple of other things. 1. Those who are not affiliated with any church/do not attend services anywhere use this as their identifier (since I don't believe I've ever seen a "No Church" or "Lone Wolf" Christian designation anywhere). 2. It is sometimes used by non-Christians for a similar reason. This allows both of these types of folks to post on Christian ONLY forums, where a different designation would not.

 

--David

Edited by David Lee
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1. Those who are not affiliated with any church/do not attend services anywhere use this as their identifier (since I don't believe I've ever seen a "No Church" or "Lone Wolf" Christian designation anywhere.

 

I just added a "No-church" affiliation in the denomination field upon registration and in profiles.

 

I think some in the future may take advantage of that field choice, because either they are unable to attend church or they simply do not agree with any denomination.

 

God bless,

William

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great idea :RpS_thumbup: I don't think I can tell you how many people I've run into on forums over the years who call themselves Christians, but have NEVER attended a church service or a Bible Study. I'm stunned, quite frankly, that such a thing is possible.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Great idea :RpS_thumbup: I don't think I can tell you how many people I've run into on forums over the years who call themselves Christians, but have NEVER attended a church service or a Bible Study. I'm stunned, quite frankly, that such a thing is possible.

 

But I personally think you and Andrew nailed it. Most non-denominational refuse "labels" and do not agree with denominations. Ever walk in a grocery store and see labels? Of course you have, but non-denominationalist tend to take offense over the label and therefore never learn about the theological meaning. I have to admit, in "general" my greatest headaches are with non-denominationlist. They tend not to agree with anyone. Not to mention anyone in their own body, after all they have no creeds or confessions!

 

As far a John MacArthur, I love the man. But I tend to use caution with him. He is a leaky dispensationalist and rejects Covenant theology. He just doesn't align with the Reformed Faith in entirety. He is inconsistent when held to that standard. What I admire about John is his conviction. I think he genuinely believes what he says. There is no in between. But I find myself taking R.C. Sproul's position more than MacArthur on issues of Covenant baptism rather than Credo baptism. I consider these things secondary though, and have no reservations recommending John Mac. to anyone.

 

God bless,

William

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wasn't John's dad, Jack, a Baptist preacher? It seems to me that MacArthur is like a Reformed Baptist in many of his beliefs (though I could be wrong), but non-denominational his church is.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
But I personally think you and Andrew nailed it. Most non-denominational refuse "labels" and do not agree with denominations. Ever walk in a grocery store and see labels? Of course you have, but non-denominationalist tend to take offense over the label and therefore never learn about the theological meaning. I have to admit, in "general" my greatest headaches are with non-denominationlist. They tend not to agree with anyone. Not to mention anyone in their own body, after all they have no creeds or confessions!

 

I guess, speaking for myself, I don't even consider myself a "non-denominationalist". I've simply cared less and less about various denominations and "labels", not because they offend me, but because I would rather focus on what is truly important and the core elements of the Christian faith. No one gets everything right, after all, and it's the Gospel that truly matters, our faith in Jesus Christ.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I just added a "No-church" affiliation in the denomination field upon registration and in profiles.

 

I think some in the future may take advantage of that field choice, because either they are unable to attend church or they simply do not agree with any denomination.

 

God bless,

William

 

I pray with you guys since you are talking about things that are close to my heart. William you said non denominationalists give you the most head ache. May I as k why ? You also spoke about non denoms just despise labels. They are not so much labels but walls you have built around you . Most that are of the traditional church fear the thought of finding Jesus out side the institution. Please don't think I'm taking offense but a stand.. I don't know the reasoning's for other non denoms , but I know I am not alone when I say many got a glimpse of the truth which is revealed. I'm still new here and you don't know my past as a believer. So may I ask what idea do yoy have about non denoms. Are they rebellious, backsliden and anchor with out a rope. One believer told me a long time back, you can' never know another until you walk a mile in his moccasins.

 

David gave some good quotes from Spurgeon Elizabeth Elliot. Of course I have not read any of their books

 

I Like Paul myself who said if I live it is no longer I who lives but Christ in me.

 

9 What? know ye not that your body is the temple of the Holy Ghost which is in you. 1 Co 6:19-20

 

I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live; yet not I, but Christ liveth in me: and the life which I now live in the flesh I live by the faith of the Son of God, who loved me Ga 2:20

 

Do labels connect you to Christ. My testimony goes way back

 

God bless you David and William

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Mitchel, so are you a member of an independent/non-denominational church, or are you using "Non-Denominational" as your identifier because you are not (presently anyway) part of any denomination or church (I hope you don't mind me asking).

 

Thanks!

 

--David

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi Mitchel, so are you a member of an independent/non-denominational church, or are you using "Non-Denominational" as your identifier because you are not (presently anyway) part of any denomination or church (I hope you don't mind me asking).

 

Thanks!

 

--David

 

Today in our free world church we have mindsets since the reformation cut the church up like chopping vegetables for dinner. I am no member of any independent church. They are still the same duck. They are just as traditional minus the name. Am I attending any church now? the yes. We all need fellowship, but I am not of the church because I go there. I am the church because Jesus and I are one as He is one with the Father. I would ask you if I may when are you in church .

 

I have said I am a non denominationalist but not as an identifier. I could say I go to a nondenominational church, but walking in they are as traditional as any other church. Im just a follower of Christ . Where I am fellowshipping now is out of convenience. Before I was part of a open church ministry in a local park I was with that nontraditional ministry for several years. It started out as a means to feed and reach those who had not work during the recession. I am a servant and nothing else. I hope this answers your question.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I confess the only denomination I see in the NT is Christian which was given to the Christians because they so resembled Christ in life and manner. I tend to for the most part agree with Bunyan that the names Presbyterian Congregational Baptist etc. have more the name of Hell than the New Jerusalem. Divide and conquer is an ancient strategy. However I do understand the much over use of the non-denominational "label". As mentioned a great many people in today's society use the term who have never darkened the door of a church. I know a few people like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It seems to be(at least in the way it is used today) all things to all people.It means whatever the person using it wants it to mean.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How I arrived.

 

I did not grow up believing in God or any form of eternal existence. I believed you are born you live and then you are dirt. For me a life of sin brought me to my arrogant knees. I started praying every morning to a God I didn't know. The idea was to do, be in and live His will instead of mine because of where mine had brought me. Eventually I started believing there is more to life, that there is actually something more going on and I began to believe in God. I wanted to know if Jesus was a part of this God, this something more that I had started believing existed. I decided the New Testament was the place to go and I did not care if Jesus was a part of God or not I simply wanted to read the NT and make a decision. Somewhere between Matthew and Revelation I met Jesus and became a believer.

 

I had check out and been to the Mormon church because my wife was Mormon but I never believed. I went to make her happy. Now believing in Christ I no longer wanted anything to do with Mormonism or man made “religion”. It took me two years of constantly reading the bible and praying before I went to a Christian church where for the first time I felt I was home.

 

I had looked at the Catholic church and it traditions and that to me was to close to man made religion. I know Christ is my savior but I know how is sounds when I say I don't like religion but that is where I am at with it. Faith in Christ alone means a lot to me. The church I go to teaches that to be a member of the body of Christ and in fellowship with other Christians is the way God intended to be.

 

Being nondenominational is not as much as wanting all denominations to be one as it is to personally focus on Christ. I certainly believe there are Christians in all denominations.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As for me, my break through moment was while reading John Calvin on the Sovereignty of God.

William, can you specify where this was? (Edit: Someplace in the Institutes, I suppose?)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I can't after having lost a ton of documents on my computer some time ago.

Oh, that's unfortunate. Sorry to hear it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So, back to topic, Non- Denominational Christians have no denominational affiliation because they want to strive for unity and part of doing that means surrendering any denominational labels, such as Lutherans, Anglicans, Christian Reformed, Orthodox Presbyterians, Wesleyans, etc.?

I think in a sense, that may be backwards. The Christian (individual) identifies as "Non-Denominational" because they attend a church (local assembly) that is non-denominational. The Local Assembly is 'non-denominational' because they believe that there should be no filter between God and the Local Assembly (which my experience has shown me to be both a good thing and a bad thing).

 

These individuals attend this 'non-denominational' local assembly because it meets some spiritual and social need in their life. So I suspect that those drawn to a "non-denominational" local church probably have a strong sense of personal connection to God and a weak attraction to the historical Church. In the vernacular of the churches that I have attended, they would say they want a relationship, but not a 'religion'.

 

For myself, I am the opposite. I actually identify with every denomination that I have been a part of because the unique 'flavor' of each has contributed in some way to my appreciation for the diversity of the True Church. So I am a Lutheran and a Church of God (Indiana) and an Evangelical and a Southern Baptist and a Pentecostal ... who happens to personally embrace 'Reformed Baptist' Theology. If the local Presbyterian churches were not the OTHER variety, I would probably enjoy learning more about Covenant Household Worship from them.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
Articles - News - Privacy Policy