Here's why you shouldn't give money to charity:

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  • Here's why you shouldn't give money to charity:

    Here is a sample of some of the worst charities. They raise millions, but most of the money is spent on raising money. Then, most of the rest is spent on themselves. And, very little actually goes to those the money was donated for:

    Charity name Total raised by solicitors Paid to solicitors % spent on direct cash aid
    Kids Wish Network $137.9 million $115.9 million 2.5%
    Cancer Fund of America $86.8 million $75.4 million 1.0%
    Children's Wish Foundation International $92.7 million $61.2 million 10.6%
    Firefighters Charitable Foundation $62.8 million $53.8 million 7.4%
    International Union of Police Associations, AFL-CIO $66.6 million $50.4 million 0.5%
    Breast Cancer Relief Foundation $63.9 million $44.8 million 2.2%
    American Association of State Troopers $48.1 million $38.6 million 8.9%
    National Veterans Service Fund $70.2 million $36.9 million 7.8%
    Children's Cancer Fund of America $43.7 million $34.4 million 4.6%
    Children's Cancer Recovery Foundation $38.5 million $28.9 million 0.7%
    Project Cure (Bradenton, FL) $53.8 million $25.5 million 0.0%
    Committee For Missing Children $26.6 million $23.5 million 0.8%
    Youth Development Fund $27.5 million $22.6 million 1.0%
    Association for Firefighters and Paramedics $24.0 million $21.4 million 3.1%
    Woman To Woman Breast Cancer Foundation $19.4 million $18.2 million 0.3%

    The first on the list, for example, the Kids Wish Network collected 137.9 million dollars in donations, but only 2.5% of that was used for kids. These are self-reported (to the IRS) numbers, so in all likelihood these charities didn't use as much as they claim to have used on those you were wanting to help. Most professional charities use most donations on raising money and most of the rest on themselves (so, the executives can live in mansions). These charities are a business out to make money for themselves. They don't exist to help anyone except by means of selling a product, and that's a product that the buyer doesn't know whether it's delivered or not.

    Do you want to give money to a Breast Cancer charity? Why? Our government and insurance companies already spend billions upon billions of dollars on Breast Cancer treatment and research. All you donation is going to do is fund a pro-abortion feminist organization, with only pennies on the dollar going to the actual cause you want to help. Even sadder is that Christians give the most to charities, even without counting money given to their churches, and that's after paying a lot more in taxes for being married, suckers!

    There are a few good places to donate money. The best places to donate money are directly to organizations that aren't charities, but are local, non-profit organizations working for the good of your community, such as the Boy Scouts and your local Church. They don't exist for the sake of raising money and they are more accountable to you.

    Don't give money to professional charities. But, if you insist, at least do a little research on that charity. Check with watchdog organizations or check with the IRS (non-profits have their tax forms online at the IRS).





  • #2
    Oh, and what about those dreaded "Prosperity Preachers". lol, if you live by one of those mega churches you may want to reconsider it even if local! Those charity organizations remind me of prosperity preachers.

    I love this clip of John Piper ranting....



    God bless,
    William
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    • #3
      Great clip! Very true. Voice of the Martyrs is a good missionary source. They endure pain, suffering, prison, death in the name of Jesus Christ. They are the real deal, not prosperity gospel. None of this "word of knowledge" of suffering and a magic prayer for recovery, so poof! They're cured... Thanks to the 700 club. VOM is a fine organization, working in countries that are hostile to Christians.
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      • #4
        I prefer to give to small charities, often with very simple aims.

        For example “Mary’s Meals” is a charity that is still run by it’s founder from a shed in his parent’s garden. For every £1 donated 93 pence is spent on the actual charitable work.

        Their vision is very simple. In very poor countries children often cannot go to school because they are too busy trying to earn money to eat. And those that do get to school are often so malnourished they cannot concentrate.

        They say:
        Around 57 million of the world’s hungriest children do not attend school.
        In order to survive, they have to work or beg.
        Even if they do make it into the classroom, hunger affects their ability to learn.


        Mary’s Meals aims to provide a simple nutritious meal for each child. The food is sourced locally, the people who make and serve the meals are local women – parents usually. Mary’s Meals provides the cooking facility (highly efficient wood burning stoves), the cooking vessels and the mugs for the meals. They now serve over 1,000,000 meals a day.

        They reckom it costs just £12.20 to feed one child for a whole school year.

        Home | Mary's Meals

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        • #5
          Sounds like a useful charity, Bede. VOM will give an account of their financial breakdown. Their father started out being imprisoned. His name was Richard Wurmbrand. Some of their work is similar to Franklin Graham's Samaritan's purse in sending the gospel any way they can get it in to hostile countries. They focus on conversion and church building where people are starving for the gospel, amidst hostile governments as well as more benign ones. There is also BCM, which is an excellent place to support. We just have to be careful, as it sounds like you are.
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          • #6
            Here is an organization that can help you find out which charities are worth supporting:

            Charity Navigator - Your Guide To Intelligent Giving | Home
            Clyde Herrin's Blog
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            • #7
              I like charities or organisation that try to help people help themselves.

              Another organisation that I support (not a charity) is "Lend With Care". You lend to people in the third world through an organisation that deals with local microfinance organisations.

              People just want small loans (small to us) to help them improve their bisnesses or with their farming. Businesses means something like a market stall, a welder, a small cafe or an itinerant trader.

              They repay the loans so you can just recycle the money to new loans. If you have a bit of time just look at some of the "entrepreneurs"

              Find an Entrepreneur and start helping them today | lendwithcare.org
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              • #8
                Originally posted by theophilus View Post
                Here is an organization that can help you find out which charities are worth supporting:

                Charity Navigator - Your Guide To Intelligent Giving | Home

                That's a good source to find charities to give to. But, still, those numbers are self-reported. There's no mechanism to make these numbers honest, unless they submit to independent audits.

                About a year ago I looked into Girls On The Run, after the local school was hosting it. It's a program to encourage girls to be more physically active by organizing runs for grade school girls. According to their 990 filing 56.9% of revenue is spent the programs it delivers. Yet, the local runs are provided by free volunteers. And, girls who take part have to pay $150 (then there are donations other than entry fees). The girls get a pair of shoes, t-shirt, and water bottle, but the shoes are donated to the charity by a shoe company. So, it costs almost $90 per girl for volunteers to encourage girls to run, with a t-shirt and water bottle thrown in? There's no reason for swag, overhead, and insurance to be more than $20 per child. Going with that, less than 15% is actually spent on delivered services, not over 40% as their 990 claims.

                So, still, keep your charity close to home, starting with your church and otherwise paid directly, not through charities (organizations that exist to raise money), to organizations that you support.
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                • #9
                  There are far too many of these large scale charities taking advantage of peoples generosity. The mega churches are also pretty bad about taking, and mismanaging donations. I've seen this black preacher, Creflo Dollar, from some where in the south get on TV and lobby for the congregation he preaches to donate enough to buy him a private jet. I'm not sure if he ever got that jet, but nonetheless people don't do their research. They easily get suckered in based off of feeling.
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                  • #10
                    The first charity organization I encountered was the Salvation Army. At first, I thought it was really a military group since those Americans were in uniform. And I was surprised when my father said that those foreigners were here in our country to beg money for charity. I have double mind on this thread. I agree that those charitable organizations spend for the employees and maybe just a fraction is left for its main purpose of charity. The same with our lotto where the government agency handling the lotto has employed people and spend for their office. But in fairness to those organizations, how can they be organized if they don't spend? And how could they operate if they have no employees and no office? So maybe we can take it with a grain of salt that when we give to charity that we give with our heart and not with our mind.
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                    • #11
                      Most beggars you see in the streets are usually part of criminal organizations who extort tourists into giving them money, or more often than not, picking their pockets for their valuables. I never truly believed that you should give them money, if you really want to help, just give them food that they can consume on the spot, and not something that they may spend on nefarious things later.
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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Corzhens View Post
                        The first charity organization I encountered was the Salvation Army. At first, I thought it was really a military group since those Americans were in uniform. And I was surprised when my father said that those foreigners were here in our country to beg money for charity. I have double mind on this thread. I agree that those charitable organizations spend for the employees and maybe just a fraction is left for its main purpose of charity. The same with our lotto where the government agency handling the lotto has employed people and spend for their office. But in fairness to those organizations, how can they be organized if they don't spend? And how could they operate if they have no employees and no office? So maybe we can take it with a grain of salt that when we give to charity that we give with our heart and not with our mind.
                        I have, in the past, often given to the Salvation Army Store in our area, until I got to thinking about it more carefully. For one thing, you give your stuff away free to the store and they take it, sort it, slap price tags on it and sell it for quite the tidy little profit. I question just how much of that money actually goes to help out those who need it the most. Quick and quiet conversations with the sales clerks can be quite revealing. One day I was buying khaki pants for my husband and the clerk said it would be discounted because there was a tiny spot on it. (I looked but never did find that spot..) She took several dollars off the price and then told me that they don't usually put damaged goods on the shelves to sell here in the states. I asked her what they do with them, and she told me they "usually send that stuff overseas to third world nations for the poor people to pick through." This explanation sounded so vulgar to me. Aren't the poor people the ones who should be helped out here? Why can't a poor person get something nice to wear so he or she can dress for a job interview or something? At any rate, I have a family member who is associated with a group who always need stuff, clothes, shoes, whatever. I just take my charity donations to him and he distributes them to the needy himself. Works for me. :)
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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Novelangel View Post
                          I have, in the past, often given to the Salvation Army Store in our area, until I got to thinking about it more carefully. For one thing, you give your stuff away free to the store and they take it, sort it, slap price tags on it and sell it for quite the tidy little profit. I question just how much of that money actually goes to help out those who need it the most. Quick and quiet conversations with the sales clerks can be quite revealing. One day I was buying khaki pants for my husband and the clerk said it would be discounted because there was a tiny spot on it. (I looked but never did find that spot..) She took several dollars off the price and then told me that they don't usually put damaged goods on the shelves to sell here in the states. I asked her what they do with them, and she told me they "usually send that stuff overseas to third world nations for the poor people to pick through." This explanation sounded so vulgar to me. Aren't the poor people the ones who should be helped out here? Why can't a poor person get something nice to wear so he or she can dress for a job interview or something? At any rate, I have a family member who is associated with a group who always need stuff, clothes, shoes, whatever. I just take my charity donations to him and he distributes them to the needy himself. Works for me. :)
                          This might be unsettling but I've heard and read of this so many time. That the used clothing items of the Salvation army is being donated to the Philippines. It comes in huge containers and supposed to be tax free because it is a donation. And guess what, those clothes land in stores called Ukay-ukay. That scheme started in this new millennium and was popularized in Baguio City, the mountain resort north of Manila. We didn't know that what they were selling in the flea markets were used clothes. And it took years before we learned that those used clothing for sale were donations from the Salvation Army.
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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Corzhens View Post

                            This might be unsettling but I've heard and read of this so many time. That the used clothing items of the Salvation army is being donated to the Philippines. It comes in huge containers and supposed to be tax free because it is a donation. And guess what, those clothes land in stores called Ukay-ukay. That scheme started in this new millennium and was popularized in Baguio City, the mountain resort north of Manila. We didn't know that what they were selling in the flea markets were used clothes. And it took years before we learned that those used clothing for sale were donations from the Salvation Army.
                            That burns me up. People are crooked everywhere and are only trying to dig every dime out of everyone's wallets. I'm never going to give to the Salvation Army store again. I'm going to just take all my unwanted stuff directly to where it will be distributed free of charge, to needy people. Everywhere we turn, it's all the same. We donate here, and our donations get sold here with most of the money going back into the stores. Why can't they just give those items away to the needy? ... The almighty buck is why.
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                            • #15
                              I generally stay away for cash donations to any charity or church. I pay my tenth every month, but that is a different thing altogether. I tend to donate time and materials. An example of this is that I regularly donate food to our churches soup kitchen as well as spend time making and dishing soup. Imo this is the only way to make sure your charity goes to where it is intended.
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