There is something healthy about returning to one’s roots. When it comes to evangelical Christianity, its roots are found in the soil of the sixteenth-century Protestant Reformation.

Unconditional Election

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  • Unconditional Election

    R.C. Sproul

    Who will be saved?

    Everybody needs to have some understanding of predestination since it’s in the Bible.

    The dictionary says that “predestinate” means, “to foreordain to an earthly or eternal lot or destiny by divine decree.” Or, in simpler terms predestination means, “God’s decision as to what will happen to a person, especially after they die (heaven or hell).”

    There are two basic responses to the idea of predestination:

    1. God makes His choice based on his foreknowledge. This means that God (who is omniscient) chooses those He saw from the beginning who would choose God, have faith and follow Christ.

    2. From all eternity God decided to save some members of the human race and to let the rest of the human race perish. God made a choice – He chose some individuals to be saved unto everlasting blessedness in heaven, and He chose others to pass over, allowing them to suffer the consequences of their sins, eternal punishment in hell. He chooses based on His good pleasure who will receive grace and who will not. Those that He gives grace, are changed. They desire God and receive the gift of faith and salvation.

    In the previous article we studied Total Depravity and determined that nobody chooses God by their own goodness. Based on that, we can see that option #1 above isn’t a likely answer, but let’s see what the Bible says about predestination.

    Proverbs 16:4
    The LORD has made all for Himself, yes, even the wicked for the day of doom. (NKJ)

    Exodus 7:1-5
    So the LORD said to Moses: "See, I have made you as God to Pharaoh, and Aaron your brother shall be your prophet. "You shall speak all that I command you. And Aaron your brother shall speak to Pharaoh, to send the children of Israel out of his land. "And I will harden Pharaoh's heart, and multiply My signs and My wonders in the land of Egypt. "But Pharaoh will not heed you, so that I may lay My hand on Egypt and bring My armies and My people, the children of Israel, out of the land of Egypt by great judgments." And the Egyptians shall know that I am the LORD, when I stretch out My hand on Egypt and bring out the children of Israel from among them." (NKJ)

    John 13:18
    "I do not speak concerning all of you. I know whom I have chosen; but that the Scripture may be fulfilled, 'He who eats bread with Me has lifted up his heel against Me.' (NKJ)

    Romans 8:28-30
    And we know that all things work together for good to those who love God, to those who are the called according to His purpose. For whom He foreknew, He also predestined to be conformed to the image of His Son, that He might be the firstborn among many brethren. Moreover whom He predestined, these He also called; whom He called, these He also justified; and whom He justified, these He also glorified. (NKJ)

    (NOTE: See pages 142-144 in Grace Unknown)

    Jude 1:3-4
    Beloved, while I was very diligent to write to you concerning our common salvation, I found it necessary to write to you exhorting you to contend earnestly for the faith which was once for all delivered to the saints. For certain men have crept in unnoticed, who long ago were marked out for this condemnation, ungodly men, who turn the grace of our God into lewdness and deny the only Lord God and our Lord Jesus Christ. (NKJ)

    1 Peter 1:1-2
    Peter, an apostle of Jesus Christ, To the pilgrims of the Dispersion in Pontus, Galatia, Cappadocia, Asia, and Bithynia, elect according to the foreknowledge of God the Father, in sanctification of the Spirit, for obedience and sprinkling of the blood of Jesus Christ: Grace to you and peace be multiplied. (NKJ)

    II Thessalonians 2:13-15
    But we are bound to give thanks to God always for you, brethren beloved by the Lord, because God from the beginning chose you for salvation through sanctification by the Spirit and belief in the truth, to which He called you by our gospel, for the obtaining of the glory of our Lord Jesus Christ. Therefore, brethren, stand fast and hold the traditions which you were taught, whether by word or our epistle. (NKJ)

    Ephesians 1:3-14
    Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who has blessed us with every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places in Christ, just as He chose us in Him before the foundation of the world, that we should be holy and without blame before Him in love, having predestined us to adoption as sons by Jesus Christ to Himself, according to the good pleasure of His will, to the praise of the glory of His grace, by which He has made us accepted in the Beloved. In Him we have redemption through His blood, the forgiveness of sins, according to the riches of His grace which He made to abound toward us in all wisdom and prudence, having made known to us the mystery of His will, according to His good pleasure which He purposed in Himself, that in the dispensation of the fullness of the times He might gather together in one all things in Christ, both which are in heaven and which are on earth-- in Him. In Him also we have obtained an inheritance, being predestined according to the purpose of Him who works all things according to the counsel of His will, that we who first trusted in Christ should be to the praise of His glory. In Him you also trusted, after you heard the word of truth, the gospel of your salvation; in whom also, having believed, you were sealed with the Holy Spirit of promise, who is the guarantee of our inheritance until the redemption of the purchased possession, to the praise of His glory. (NKJ)

    Romans 9:6-25
    But it is not that the word of God has taken no effect. For they are not all Israel who are of Israel, nor are they all children because they are the seed of Abraham; but, "In Isaac your seed shall be called." That is, those who are the children of the flesh, these are not the children of God; but the children of the promise are counted as the seed. For this is the word of promise: "At this time I will come and Sarah shall have a son." And not only this, but when Rebecca also had conceived by one man, even by our father Isaac (for the children not yet being born, nor having done any good or evil, that the purpose of God according to election might stand, not of works but of Him who calls), it was said to her, "The older shall serve the younger." As it is written, "Jacob I have loved, but Esau I have hated." What shall we say then? Is there unrighteousness with God? Certainly not! For He says to Moses, "I will have mercy on whomever I will have mercy, and I will have compassion on whomever I will have compassion." So then it is not of him who wills, nor of him who runs, but of God who shows mercy. For the Scripture says to Pharaoh, "For this very purpose I have raised you up, that I may show My power in you, and that My name may be declared in all the earth." Therefore He has mercy on whom He wills, and whom He wills He hardens. You will say to me then, "Why does He still find fault? For who has resisted His will?" But indeed, O man, who are you to reply against God? Will the thing formed say to him who formed it, "Why have you made me like this?" Does not the potter have power over the clay, from the same lump to make one vessel for honor and another for dishonor? What if God, wanting to show His wrath and to make His power known, endured with much longsuffering the vessels of wrath prepared for destruction, and that He might make known the riches of His glory on the vessels of mercy, which He had prepared beforehand for glory, even us whom He called, not of the Jews only, but also of the Gentiles? As He says also in Hosea: "I will call them My people, who were not My people, and her beloved, who was not beloved." (NKJ)

  • #2
    There's a third view, which is a blend on 1 and 2 plus the fact that God saves all His wheat, but none of the devil's tares, because the wheat are the children of God and the tares are the children of the devil. (Matthew 13 and John 8:34-58 KJV.) That is the one I adhere to since it's in the Bible, too. It is a completion of R.C. Sproul's thoughts. Also, John 6:65-66 KJV.
    Comment>

    • #3
      Point 2 gave me an idea for a meme:

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      • #4
        So true. He rose from the dead, came back, and did many miracles and still they don't believe, unless the Father draws them. Then they shall come to Jesus and not be cast out for any reason. John 6:37-47 KJV
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        • #5
          The reality is close to #1, and Rom 8:28-30
          • [SIZE=2]28 [/SIZE]And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose.
          • [SIZE=2]29 [/SIZE]For those God foreknew he also predestined to be conformed to the image of his Son, that he might be the firstborn among many brothers and sisters.
          • [SIZE=2]30 [/SIZE]And those he predestined, he also called; those he called, he also justified; those he justified, he also glorified.

          God calls those He foreknows will chose His son as their savior, v29. Then He predestines those same people to be CONFORMED to the image of his Son, i.e.; Christlike.

          Obviously #2 is wrong because of what 2 Peter 3:9 states.

          Predestination is defined in scripture, we don't use a dictionary to give us a definition, especially as when this was written there was no English language or dictionary.
          The English definition is close but NOT fully accurate. The Greek is προορίζω (proorizō), and connotes to limit or mark out beforehand; to design definitely beforehand, ordain beforehand. To be Christ like is what God predestined those He foreknew. Foreknowledge is how God made all His plans.
          We are indeed elect, but only based on God's foreknowledge as stated in 1 Peter 1:1-3. We are NOT the elect before we are.

          Indeed predestination is in the Bible, but not as depicted in the OP to support Sovereign Election. R.C. Sproul is wrong.





          Comment>

          • #6
            Originally posted by Stan View Post
            The reality is close to #1, and Rom 8:28-30
            • [SIZE=10px]28 [/SIZE]And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose.
            • [SIZE=10px]29 [/SIZE]For those God foreknew he also predestined to be conformed to the image of his Son, that he might be the firstborn among many brothers and sisters.
            • [SIZE=10px]30 [/SIZE]And those he predestined, he also called; those he called, he also justified; those he justified, he also glorified.


            God calls those He foreknows will chose His son as their savior, v29. Then He predestines those same people to be CONFORMED to the image of his Son, i.e.; Christlike.

            Obviously #2 is wrong because of what 2 Peter 3:9 states.

            Predestination is defined in scripture, we don't use a dictionary to give us a definition, especially as when this was written there was no English language or dictionary.
            The English definition is close but NOT fully accurate. The Greek is προορίζω (proorizō), and connotes to limit or mark out beforehand; to design definitely beforehand, ordain beforehand. To be Christ like is what God predestined those He foreknew. Foreknowledge is how God made all His plans.
            We are indeed elect, but only based on God's foreknowledge as stated in 1 Peter 1:1-3. We are NOT the elect before we are.

            Indeed predestination is in the Bible, but not as depicted in the OP to support Sovereign Election. R.C. Sproul is wrong.
            Stan,

            You often claim others commit an eisegesis, then claim you yourself providing an exegesis. Merely writing those words out do not provide what you yourself are committing and not doing. Without making this anymore personal than by just personally addressing you:

            God has always possessed perfect knowledge of all creatures and of all events. There has never been a time when anything past, present, or future was not fully known to Him. But it is not His knowledge of future events (of what people would do, etc.) which is referred to in Romans 8:29,30, for Paul clearly states that those whom He foreknew He predestined, He called, He justified, etc. Since all men are not predestined, called, and justified, it follows that all men were not foreknown by God in the sense spoken of in verse 29.

            Romans 8:29 does not refer to the foresight of faith, good works, etc.

            It is for this reason that the Arminians are forced to add some qualifying notion. They read into the passage some idea not contained in the language itself such as those whom He foreknew would believe etc., He predestined, called and justified. But according to the Biblical usage of the words “know,” “knew,” and “foreknew” there is not the least need to make such an addition, and since it is unnecessary, it is improper. When the Bible speaks of God knowing particular individuals, it often means that He has special regard for them, that they are the objects of His affection and concern. For example in Amos 3:2, God, speaking to Israel says,“You only have I known of all the families of the earth; therefore I will punish you for all your iniquities.” The Lord knows about all the families of the earth, but He knew Israel in a special way. They were His chosen people whom He had set His heart upon. See Deuteronomy 7:7,8; 10:15. Because Israel was His in a special sense He chastised them, cf. Hebrews 12:5,6.*God, speaking to Jeremiah, said, “Before I formed you in the womb, I knew you,” (Jeremiah 1:5). The meaning here is not that God knew about Jeremiah but that He had a special regard for the prophet before He formed him in his mother’s womb. Jesus also used the word “knew” in the sense of personal, intimate awareness. “On that day many will say to me, ‘Lord, Lord, did we not prophesy in your name, and cast out demons in your name, and do many mighty works in your name?’ And then will I declare to them, ‘I never knew you; depart from me, you evildoers’ “ (Matt. 7:22,23). Our Lord cannot be understood here as saying, I knew nothing about you, for it is quite evident that He knew all too much about them – their evil character and evil works; hence, His meaning must be, I never knew you intimately nor personally, I never regarded you as the objects of my favor or love. Paul uses the word in the same way in I Corinthians 8:3, “But if one loves God, one is known by him,” and also II Timothy 2:19, “the Lord knows those who are His.” The Lord knows about all men but He only knows those “who love Him, who are called according to His purpose” (Rom 8:28) – those who are His!

            I acknowledge that you believe, Stan, God looked through corridors of time and chose those who first chose Him, despite the above, and stand in complete contradiction to John 3:3, 3:5 - "Jesus answered him, “Truly, truly, I say to you, unless one is born again he cannot see the kingdom of God.” "Jesus answered, “Truly, truly, I say to you, unless one is born of water and the Spirit, he cannot enter the kingdom of God."

            My emphasis is on the word "UNLESS." The word unless in Jesus' teaching signals a universally necessary condition for seeing and entering the kingdom of God. Rebirth, then, is an essential part of Christianity, without it, entrance into God's kingdom is impossible. Regeneration is the theological term used to describe rebirth. It refers to a new generating, a new genesis, a new beginning. It is more than "turning over a new leaf"; it marks the beginning of a new life in a radically renewed person. Peters speaks of believers having "been born again, not of perishable seed but of imperishable, through the living and abiding word of God" - 1 Peter 1:23.

            Regeneration is the work of the Holy Spirit upon those who are spiritually dead (see Ephesians 2:1-10). The Spirit recreates the human heart, quickening it from spiritual death to spiritual life. Regenerate people are new creations. Where formerly they had no disposition, inclination, or desire for the things of God, now they are disposed and inclined toward God. In regeneration, God plants a desire for Himself in the human heart that otherwise would not be there.

            Regeneration is not to be confused with the full experience of conversion. Just as birth is our initiation, our first entrance into life outside the womb, so our spiritual rebirth is the starting point of our spiritual life. It occurs by God's divine initiative and is an act that is soverign, immediate, and instantaneous. An awareness of our conversion may be gradual. Yet rebirth itself is instantaneous. No one can be partially reborn any more than a woman can be partially pregnant.

            Regeneration is not the fruit or result of faith. Rather, regeneration precedes faith as the necessary condition for faith. We also do not in any way dispose ourselves toward regeneration or cooperate as coworkers with the Holy Spirit to bring it to pass. We do not decide or choose to be regenerated. God chooses to regenerate us before we will ever choose to embrace Him. To be sure, after we have been regenerated by the sovereign grace of God, we do choose, act, cooperate, and believe in Christ. God does not have faith for us. It is our own faith by which we are justified. What God does is quicken us to spiritual life, rescuing us from darkness, bondage, and spiritual death. God makes faith possible and actual for us. He quickens faith within us.

            As for 2 Peter 3:9 - Peter's Christian readers must realize that the apparent delay of divine judgment is a sign of God's forbearance and mercy toward them, particularly toward the believers in their midst who have been confused and misled by the false teachers. The repentance in view, for the sake of which God delays judgment, is that of God's people rather than the world at large. God is not willing that any of His elect should perish (John 6:39). In the context of the epistle, the "any" of this verse refers back to the "us" of 1:3, indicating that Peter is talking about the elect, those whom God has granted everything necessary for life and godliness. The verse is not teaching that God wants everyone to be saved such that He is frustrated by the fact that not everyone is saved, and it is not endorsing universalism that says everyone will be saved in the end. God has an elect people whom He has purposed to redeem and who will therefore be saved, for no purpose of His can be thwarted (Romans 9:1-29; Job 42:2). The Lord does not delight in the death of the wicked, but His eternal purposes are not overturned and He is not thrown into depression when people reject His Gospel (Ezekiel 18:32, 1 Timothy 2:4).

            For further understanding I suggest reading: What is the difference between God's sovereign will and God's perfect will? -Christforums

            God bless,
            William
            Comment>

            • #7
              Great write-up, William. I would make one comment. Faith does not come from ourselves but is given to us from God alone: Ephesians 2:8-9 KJV.
              Comment>

              • #8
                Originally posted by William View Post
                Stan,
                You often claim others commit an eisegesis, then claim you yourself providing an exegesis. Merely writing those words out do not provide what you yourself are committing and not doing. Without making this anymore personal than by just personally addressing you:
                Well I don't JUST state it I supply the exegesis, which interestingly enough never gets dealt with.

                Originally posted by William View Post
                God has always possessed perfect knowledge of all creatures and of all events. There has never been a time when anything past, present, or future was not fully known to Him. But it is not His knowledge of future events (of what people would do, etc.) which is referred to in Romans 8:29,30, for Paul clearly states that those whom He foreknew He predestined, He called, He justified, etc. Since all men are not predestined, called, and justified, it follows that all men were not foreknown by God in the sense spoken of in verse 29.
                Yes that's right William, those He foreknew would accept His Son as their savior, are predestined to be CONFORMED to the image of His Son. As that happens, they become called, justified and glorified. This is also depicted in Acts 2:23, Rom 11:2 and 1 Peter 1:2

                Originally posted by William View Post
                Romans 8:29 does not refer to the foresight of faith, good works, etc.
                Another assertion without corroboration William. God's foreknowledge is just that, foreknowledge, KNOWING what will happen in the future. For this very reason His plan of salvation was fully formed BEFORE He created the universe. God KNEW what Adam and Eve would do and as such had this plan ready. There is no other way to properly convey the meaning of foreknowledge unless you are trying to eisegete.

                Originally posted by William View Post
                It is for this reason that the Arminians are forced to add some qualifying notion. They read into the passage some idea not contained in the language itself such as those whom He foreknew would believe etc., He predestined, called and justified. But according to the Biblical usage of the words “know,” “knew,” and “foreknew” there is not the least need to make such an addition, and since it is unnecessary, it is improper. When the Bible speaks of God knowing particular individuals, it often means that He has special regard for them, that they are the objects of His affection and concern. For example in Amos 3:2, God, speaking to Israel says,“You only have I known of all the families of the earth; therefore I will punish you for all your iniquities.” The Lord knows about all the families of the earth, but He knew Israel in a special way. They were His chosen people whom He had set His heart upon. See Deuteronomy 7:7,8; 10:15. Because Israel was His in a special sense He chastised them, cf. Hebrews 12:5,6.*God, speaking to Jeremiah, said, “Before I formed you in the womb, I knew you,” (Jeremiah 1:5). The meaning here is not that God knew about Jeremiah but that He had a special regard for the prophet before He formed him in his mother’s womb. Jesus also used the word “knew” in the sense of personal, intimate awareness. “On that day many will say to me, ‘Lord, Lord, did we not prophesy in your name, and cast out demons in your name, and do many mighty works in your name?’ And then will I declare to them, ‘I never knew you; depart from me, you evildoers’ “ (Matt. 7:22,23). Our Lord cannot be understood here as saying, I knew nothing about you, for it is quite evident that He knew all too much about them – their evil character and evil works; hence, His meaning must be, I never knew you intimately nor personally, I never regarded you as the objects of my favor or love. Paul uses the word in the same way in I Corinthians 8:3, “But if one loves God, one is known by him,” and also II Timothy 2:19, “the Lord knows those who are His.” The Lord knows about all men but He only knows those “who love Him, who are called according to His purpose” (Rom 8:28) – those who are His!
                You are trying to fit my beliefs into a doctrine that I do NOT necessarily subscribe to. I do NOT claim to be Arminian, you force that label on me. I'm not forcing anything into the language, it is already there. The eisegeting comes from the RT dogma. Dismissing the obvious without any exegesis is typical fair but doesn't work. You seem awfully reticent to supply a connotation for "foreknew", even though the word itself is not ambiguous in the least? The Greek is προγινώσκω (proginōskō), and connotes; to know beforehand, to be previously acquainted with, Acts 26:5; 2 Pet. 3:17; to determine on beforehand, to foreordain, 1 Pet. 1:20; in NT, from the Hebrew, to foreknow, to appoint as the subject of future privileges, Rom. 8:29; 11:2

                Originally posted by William View Post
                God looked through corridors of time and chose those who first chose Him, despite the above, and stand in complete contradiction to John 3:3, 3:5 - "Jesus answered him, “Truly, truly, I say to you, unless one is born again he cannot see the kingdom of God.” "Jesus answered, “Truly, truly, I say to you, unless one is born of water and the Spirit, he cannot enter the kingdom of God."
                Now there's a standard RT catch phrase; "God looked through corridors of time and chose those who first chose Him". God doesn't look down time because He is NOT subject to time. He created it. To Him, it lays out as a full canvas, which is why He has no beginning or end. As man fell away from God, we have to turn back to Him, and He has provided the way for us to do that by accepting the gift of His only Son. Yes, He foreknew in the sense of time, who would accept His Son, because that is how the Bible is written, IN time. I agree that one has to be born again, but I have no idea why you quote these verses here? Paul acknowledges that God foreknew those that were born again in these scriptures.


                Originally posted by William View Post
                My emphasis is on the word "UNLESS." The word unless in Jesus' teaching signals a universally necessary condition for seeing and entering the kingdom of God. Rebirth, then, is an essential part of Christianity, without it, entrance into God's kingdom is impossible. Regeneration is the theological term used to describe rebirth. It refers to a new generating, a new genesis, a new beginning. It is more than "turning over a new leaf"; it marks the beginning of a new life in a radically renewed person. Peters speaks of believers having "been born again, not of perishable seed but of imperishable, through the living and abiding word of God" - 1 Peter 1:23.
                I agree with this and understand it but what does this have to do with what I said?


                Originally posted by William View Post
                Regeneration is the work of the Holy Spirit upon those who are spiritually dead (see Ephesians 2:1-10). The Spirit recreates the human heart, quickening it from spiritual death to spiritual life. Regenerate people are new creations. Where formerly they had no disposition, inclination, or desire for the things of God, now they are disposed and inclined toward God. In regeneration, God plants a desire for Himself in the human heart that otherwise would not be there.
                There's no such idea as "spiritually dead" in the NT. You are either actually dead, as regards animation of the body, or you are effectively/effectually dead as regards to your current spiritual
                condition. Unless of course you believe and support annihilation? God draws us so we either respond positively, or we don't, the choice is ours. If we had no disposition to be attracted to God, He could not draw us so unless you also support the fallacious view of draw meaning dragged, then that is not possible. If we did not have a disposition to God, Jesus would not have said Ask, Seek or Knock. Both these appeals have to do with a disposition of human to want to know God. Not all humans submit to that, but clearly according to Paul in Rom 1:19-20.


                Originally posted by William View Post
                Regeneration is not to be confused with the full experience of conversion. Just as birth is our initiation, our first entrance into life outside the womb, so our spiritual rebirth is the starting point of our spiritual life. It occurs by God's divine initiative and is an act that is sovereign, immediate, and instantaneous. An awareness of our conversion may be gradual. Yet rebirth itself is instantaneous. No one can be partially reborn any more than a woman can be partially pregnant.
                Salvation/Conversion/Regeneration are one in the same William. If you are alluding to endurance, I agree, but how could you possible believe in OSAS and not see the 3 are synonymous?


                Originally posted by William View Post
                Regeneration is not the fruit or result of faith. Rather, regeneration precedes faith as the necessary condition for faith. We also do not in any way dispose ourselves toward regeneration or cooperate as coworkers with the Holy Spirit to bring it to pass. We do not decide or choose to be regenerated. God chooses to regenerate us before we will ever choose to embrace Him. To be sure, after we have been regenerated by the sovereign grace of God, we do choose, act, cooperate, and believe in Christ. God does not have faith for us. It is our own faith by which we are justified. What God does is quicken us to spiritual life, rescuing us from darkness, bondage, and spiritual death. God makes faith possible and actual for us. He quickens faith within us.
                That is not taught in scripture. Faith is required for salvation as Paul clearly states in Rom 10:9-11 and Eph 2:8-10



                Originally posted by William View Post
                As for 2 Peter 3:9 - Peter's Christian readers must realize that the apparent delay of divine judgment is a sign of God's forbearance and mercy toward them, particularly toward the believers in their midst who have been confused and misled by the false teachers. The repentance in view, for the sake of which God delays judgment, is that of God's people rather than the world at large. God is not willing that any of His elect should perish (John 6:39). In the context of the epistle, the "any" of this verse refers back to the "us" of 1:3, indicating that Peter is talking about the elect, those whom God has granted everything necessary for life and godliness. The verse is not teaching that God wants everyone to be saved such that He is frustrated by the fact that not everyone is saved, and it is not endorsing universalism that says everyone will be saved in the end. God has an elect people whom He has purposed to redeem and who will therefore be saved, for no purpose of His can be thwarted (Romans 9:1-29; Job 42:2). The Lord does not delight in the death of the wicked, but His eternal purposes are not overturned and He is not thrown into depression when people reject His Gospel (Ezekiel 18:32, 1 Timothy 2:4).
                Yes that is true, the delay was an issue with some, but the truth of what Peter writes is universal and hold true today for those who may also feel this way. John 6:39 is dealing with his Apostles/Disciples, NOT every Christian ever. It is in the past tense not the future tense unless of course one IS eisegeting scripture. God is not willing that ANY should perish is pretty clear to me but I'm not trying to protect an RT doctrine. Your assertion that any refers back to us in 1:3 is not a grammatical principle, but a totally eisegetical one.

                BTW, this website is very slow, and I am not the fastest typist in the world, but I am always waiting for it to catch up to where I stop typing. Can you please look into this?


                Comment>

                • #9
                  Please refrain from posting in the Reformed Theology Section, Stan.

                  God bless,
                  William
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