Dos and Don'ts, all we need to know is the Bible; however, not all is covered explicitly. Discuss how Christians should act or what they should do when facing divorce, smoking, and other issues.

All 613 Laws of the Old Testament

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    #16
    That doesn't address my point about which jurisdiction we are living under.

    Nor the point (which I didn't actually make) that the laws given at Sinai were never given to Gentiles, only the Israelites.

    Comment


      #17
      What about the new covenant makes some ever-standing laws void? The new covenant isn't a change in the law, but a solution to the problem of our inability to keep the whole law. We are free not because the law was eliminated, but because the penalty was eliminated. Is there a law against murder? We are not penalized for murder, yet I'm told murder is against the law.

      Comment


        #18
        Originally posted by Cornelius View Post
        What about the new covenant makes some ever-standing laws void?
        The only ever-standing laws are God’s eternal moral laws. They are not void.

        It is the codification of those laws for the Israelites that are void.

        Originally posted by Cornelius View Post
        The new covenant isn't a change in the law,
        Oh yes it is.
        “When there is a change of priesthood, there is necessarily a change of law as well” (Heb 7:12)

        And referring to the Covenants:
        "He takes away the first to establish the second" (Heb 10:9)


        Originally posted by Cornelius View Post
        but a solution to the problem of our inability to keep the whole law. We are free not because the law was eliminated, but because the penalty was eliminated. Is there a law against murder? We are not penalized for murder, yet I'm told murder is against the law.
        And we will be penalised for murder:
        "Everyone who hates his brother is a murderer, and you know that no murderer has eternal life remaining in him. " (1Jn 3:15)

        "But as for the cowardly, the faithless, the polluted, as for murderers, fornicators, sorcerers, idolaters, and all liars, their lot shall be in the lake that burns with fire and sulphur, which is the second death." (Rev 21:8)

        The penalty for sin has not been eliminated. But Christ's propitiary & sacrificial death on the cross allows God to forgive sin and thus not apply the penalty.

        If you murder and do not repent you will go to hell.

        And you are still avoiding the point that the Ten Commandments were only given to the Israelites. They were never given to the Gentiles.

        "Therefore remember that at one time you Gentiles in the flesh, called the uncircumcision by what is called the circumcision, which is made in the flesh by hands-- remember that you were at that time separated from Christ, alienated from the commonwealth of Israel, and strangers to the covenants of promise, having no hope and without God in the world." (Eph 2:12)
        Gentiles were strangers to the [Sinai] covenant.
        Last edited by Bede; 05-12-2015, 02:56 AM.

        Comment


          #19
          Originally posted by Bede View Post
          “When there is a change of priesthood, there is necessarily a change of law as well” (Heb 7:12)
          That's regarding the elimination of the Aaronic priesthood. No more priests performing sacrifices. There's no necessity in changing the laws that apply to us just because the priesthood has changed.

          And we will be penalised for murder:
          "Everyone who hates his brother is a murderer, and you know that no murderer has eternal life remaining in him. " (1Jn 3:15)
          Which is the point, murder is still against the law.

          And you are still avoiding the point that the Ten Commandments were only given to the Israelites. They were never given to the Gentiles.
          We are the Israelites:
          "Therefore remember that at one time you Gentiles in the flesh, called the uncircumcision by what is called the circumcision, which is made in the flesh by hands-- remember that you were at that time separated from Christ, alienated from the commonwealth of Israel, and strangers to the covenants of promise, having no hope and without God in the world." (Eph 2:12)
          Gentiles were strangers to the [Sinai] covenant.

          WERE strangers... 19 So then you are no longer strangers and aliens, but you are fellow citizens...


          Comment


            #20
            Originally posted by Cornelius View Post
            That's regarding the elimination of the Aaronic priesthood. No more priests performing sacrifices. There's no necessity in changing the laws that apply to us just because the priesthood has changed.
            So a change in the law doesn't mean a change in the law according to you!

            Originally posted by Cornelius View Post
            Which is the point, murder is still against the law.
            You are still not differentiating between laws and covenants.

            Let me go though this again in more detail

            God has laid down eternal moral laws - valid for all people for all time - which are written on our hearts. (Rom 2:15)

            Murder is a good example. Cain was the first to murder (Gen 4:8). Cain knew it was wrong. He needed no Ten Commandments to tell him that.

            When God called the Israelites out of Egypt to form a holy nation, he made a covenant with them at Sinai (also called Horeb) and gave them a legal code. This legal code contained a codification of his eternal moral laws, social laws and ceremonial laws. They are the 613 laws of the Sinai Covenant. They were given to the Israelites alone as their laws. They were not given to the Gentiles. They were indivisible in that to break one was to break them all

            "whoever keeps the whole law, but falls short in one particular, has become guilty in respect to all of it." (Jas 2:10).
            “Cursed be everyone who does not persevere in doing all the things written in the book of the law.” (Gal 3:10)

            Not only was it only for the Israelites but it was abolished at the cross.

            Paul describes the Jews and Gentiles as separated but then he says:
            "But now in Christ Jesus you who once were far off have been brought near in the blood of Christ. For he is our peace, who has made us both one, and has broken down the dividing wall of hostility, by abolishing in his flesh the law of commandments and ordinances, that he might create in himself one new man in place of the two," (Eph 2:13-15)

            "And you, who were dead in trespasses and the uncircumcision of your flesh, God made alive together with him, having forgiven us all our trespasses, having cancelled the bond which stood against us with its legal demands; this he set aside, nailing it to the cross." (Col 2:14)

            We are now living under the New Law of the New Covenant. This New Law is written on our hearts. Hebrews 8:8-10 quotes Jeremiah 31:31-33:
            "Behold, the days are coming, says the Lord, when I will conclude a new covenant with the house of Israel and the house of Judah. It will not be like the covenant I made with their fathers the day I took them by the hand to lead them forth from the land of Egypt; for they did not stand by my covenant and I ignored them, says the Lord."

            "But this is the covenant I will establish with the house of Israel after those days, says the Lord: I will put my laws in their minds and I will write them upon their hearts. I will be their God, and they shall be my people." (Taken from Heb)

            The Sinai Covenant is finished.
            "On the one hand, a former commandment is annulled because of its weakness and uselessness, for the law brought nothing to perfection; on the other hand, a better hope is introduced, through which we draw near to God." (Heb 7:18-19)

            "When he speaks of a “new” covenant, he declares the first one obsolete. And what has become obsolete and has grown old is close to disappearing" (Heb 8:13)

            There is a lot more I could post on that but I will leave it there.

            When the Old (Sinai) Covenant was abolished that did not abolish God's eternal moral laws, only that codification of them. God's etenal moral laws are still valid and, even though they are written on our hearts, we can find them expressed in the New Testament as laws for the New Covenant. I've given examples already for murder. Here are a few others from the Ten Commandments:

            Honour your father and your mother
            Children, obey your parents (in the Lord), for this is right. “Honour your father and mother.” (Eph 6:1-2)

            You shall not commit adultery.
            Let marriage be honoured among all and the marriage bed be kept undefiled, for God will judge the immoral and adulterers. (Heb 13:4)

            You shall not steal.
            The thief must no longer steal, but rather labour, doing honest work with his (own) hands (Eph 4:28)


            Originally posted by Cornelius View Post
            WERE strangers... 19 So then you are no longer strangers and aliens, but you are fellow citizens...
            Yes, the Gentiles were not a party to the various covenants of promise - with Abraham, Moses and David. They had no hope of salvation and of a saviour. But now Paul says:
            “But now in Christ Jesus you who once were far off have been brought near in the blood of Christ. For he is our peace, who has made us both one, and has broken down the dividing wall of hostility, by abolishing in his flesh the law of commandments and ordinances, that he might create in himself one new man in place of the two, so making peace, and might reconcile us both to God in one body through the cross, thereby bringing the hostility to an end.” (Eph 2:13-16).

            Now, in the New Covenant, we have that hope of salvation.

            Now, In the New Covenant, we are part of God's household, which is, as Paul continues, "built upon the foundation of the apostles and prophets, Christ Jesus himself being the cornerstone, in whom the whole structure is joined together and grows into a holy temple in the Lord; in whom you also are built into it for a dwelling place of God in the Spirit." (Eph 2:19-22)
            Last edited by Bede; 05-13-2015, 01:36 AM.

            Comment


              #21
              Originally posted by Bede View Post
              Paul describes the Jews and Gentiles as separated but then he says:
              "But now in Christ Jesus you who once were far off have been brought near in the blood of Christ. For he is our peace, who has made us both one, and has broken down the dividing wall of hostility, by abolishing in his flesh the law of commandments and ordinances, that he might create in himself one new man in place of the two," (Eph 2:13-15)

              "And you, who were dead in trespasses and the uncircumcision of your flesh, God made alive together with him, having forgiven us all our trespasses, having cancelled the bond which stood against us with its legal demands; this he set aside, nailing it to the cross." (Col 2:14)
              Your NT quotes are limited to the books of Paul. Paul's style makes it easy to conclude that the Law has been eliminated, but I don't believe that's his intent. His intent is to say the penalty for breaking the law has been paid for us, and so the law is not held against us. Take you quotes above. "Abolishing... the commandments" uses the same Greek word for abolishing as Paul uses when he says a widow may remarry because the law that binds her to marriage has been "abolished". Paul doesn't at all mean that the law against adultery has been abolished, he just means that the law against adultery doesn't prohibit a widow from remarriage. But, a divorced person is still prohibited from remarriage. See, the law against adultery still exists, else it would be pointness for Paul to say a widow remarrying in not guilty of breaking the law.

              Or, take you next quote, the the bond has been cancelled and its legal demand nailed to the cross. The bond he speaks of is a note of debt, a debt created by trespassing against the law. If there is no law, there is no debt. If there is no debt, there is no debt to forgive. The record of our debts, not the law, was "nailed to the cross."

              Yes, we live under a new covenant, with a change in priesthood. But, apart from Christ, we still parish for our trespasses against the Law.

              The practical problem with your argument that only the moral laws still applies makes it appear that Christians just arbitrarily choose, or choose by worldly standards, which laws they want to follow. Murder is wrong because the world says its wrong. But, adultery is commonly accepted among professing Christians, just as it is with the world. And, what do you say to the new generation of Christians who don't think homosexuality is immoral? Laws against immorality therefor don't apply to something that's not immoral.

              Comment


                #22
                Originally posted by Cornelius View Post
                Your NT quotes are limited to the books of Paul. Paul's style makes it easy to conclude that the Law has been eliminated, but I don't believe that's his intent. His intent is to say the penalty for breaking the law has been paid for us, and so the law is not held against us. Take you quotes above. "Abolishing... the commandments" uses the same Greek word for abolishing as Paul uses when he says a widow may remarry because the law that binds her to marriage has been "abolished". Paul doesn't at all mean that the law against adultery has been abolished, he just means that the law against adultery doesn't prohibit a widow from remarriage. But, a divorced person is still prohibited from remarriage. See, the law against adultery still exists, else it would be pointness for Paul to say a widow remarrying in not guilty of breaking the law.

                Or, take you next quote, the the bond has been cancelled and its legal demand nailed to the cross. The bond he speaks of is a note of debt, a debt created by trespassing against the law. If there is no law, there is no debt. If there is no debt, there is no debt to forgive. The record of our debts, not the law, was "nailed to the cross."
                I took Paul because there could be no doubt about whom Paul was speaking about. With Jesus it could be argued he was speaking as a Jew to Jews so I wanted to avoid any confusion there..But Paul clearly thinks the Law (the Sinai Law) has been abolished. Your attempts to get round what scripture clearly says do not work.

                You are still not differentiating between the eternal moral law and the Sinai Law given as the Israelites. Of course the (eternal moral) law against adultery has not been abolished.
                You say it's only the bond is the legal debt that has been abolished therefore nothing to forgive.
                When the apostles asked Jesus how to pray he told them a prayer that included asking for forgiveness (Mt 6:9-13 & Lk 11:2-4). We say that prayer regularly and I expect you do to.
                But why say it if there is nothing to forgive?

                The quote I gave from Eph clearly states "by abolishing in his flesh the law of commandments and ordinances". How much more explicit do you want " abolishing ....... the law".
                And that law of commandments and ordinances.

                You say Paul did not mean that the Sinai Covenant law was abolished. But he very clearly did from what I have posted. Here is some more:

                Paul says to the Galatian Gentiles who were Judaising
                "Tell me, you who desire to be under law, do you not hear the law? For it is written that Abraham had two sons, one by a slave and one by a free woman. But the son of the slave was born according to the flesh, the son of the free woman through promise. Now this is an allegory: these women are two covenants. One is from Mount Sinai, bearing children for slavery; she is Hagar. Now Hagar is Mount Sinai in Arabia; she corresponds to the present Jerusalem, for she is in slavery with her children. But the Jerusalem above is free, and she is our mother. For it is written, "Rejoice, O barren one who does not bear; break forth and shout, you who are not in travail; for the children of the desolate one are many more than the children of her that is married." Now we, brethren, like Isaac, are children of promise. But as at that time he who was born according to the flesh persecuted him who was born according to the Spirit, so it is now. But what does the scripture say? "Cast out the slave and her son; for the son of the slave shall not inherit with the son of the free woman." So, brethren, we are not children of the slave but of the free woman. " (Gal 4:21-31)

                He is clear. To go back to Judaism (accepting the [Sinai] Law) is to put yourself back into slavery.

                He goes on to warn them:.
                "You are separated from Christ, you who are trying to be justified by law; you have fallen from grace". (Gal 5:4)


                Then from Romans
                "Are you unaware, brothers (for I am speaking to people who know the law [i.e. Jews]), that the law has jurisdiction over one as long as one lives? Thus a married woman is bound by law to her living husband; but if her husband dies, she is released from the law in respect to her husband. Consequently, while her husband is alive she will be called an adulteress if she consorts with another man. But if her husband dies she is free from that law, and she is not an adulteress if she consorts with another man.
                In the same way, my brothers, you also were put to death to the law through the body of Christ, so that you might belong to another, to the one who was raised from the dead in order that we might bear fruit for God. For when we were in the flesh, our sinful passions, awakened by the law, worked in our members to bear fruit for death. But now we are released from the law, dead to what held us captive, so that we may serve in the newness of the spirit and not under the obsolete letter." (Rom 7:1-6)
                We [Jews] are put to death to the Law
                We [Jews] are released from the Law

                Paul himself declares he is no longer under the Law.
                "To the Jews I became as a Jew, in order to win Jews; to those under the law I became as one under the law--though not being myself under the law--that I might win those under the law. To those outside the law [Gentiles] I became as one outside the law--not being without law toward God but under the law of Christ--that I might win those outside the law."

                He also makes here a clear distinction between those under the Law (the Jews) and those not under the Law (the Gentiles)


                Galatians 3:
                "Before faith came, we [Jews] were held in custody under law, confined for the faith that was to be revealed. Consequently, the law was our disciplinarian for Christ, that we might be justified by faith. But now that faith has come, we are no longer under a disciplinarian." (Gal 3:23-25).
                We (Jews) are no longer under the Law

                This is all the Law of the Old (Sinai) Covenant. I really don't understand why you have a problem with this.

                I'm not trashing the Ten Commandments. For the most part they are an excellent summary of God's eternal moral law and they are well known. But they are not all moral law. Nor are all moral laws included in the Ten Commandments.


                Originally posted by Cornelius View Post
                Yes, we live under a new covenant, with a change in priesthood. But, apart from Christ, we still parish for our trespasses against the Law.
                And with that change of the priesthood is a change in the law (Heb 7:12)

                We will perish for our trespasses against the eternal moral law written on our hearts and spelled out for us in the NT.

                Originally posted by Cornelius View Post
                The practical problem with your argument that only the moral laws still applies makes it appear that Christians just arbitrarily choose, or choose by worldly standards, which laws they want to follow. Murder is wrong because the world says its wrong. But, adultery is commonly accepted among professing Christians, just as it is with the world. And, what do you say to the new generation of Christians who don't think homosexuality is immoral? Laws against immorality therefor don't apply to something that's not immoral.
                Nowhere have I suggested some arbitrary choosing by worldly standards, I have given you quotes to show that murder, adultery, homosexual practice (and more) are all condemned in the New Testament.

                I can't understand why you want to live under the Old Covenant that no longer exists

                I'm sure you don't really believe that we should be following all 613 Jewish Laws that William listed. So which do you pick? What arbitrary selection do you make?


                P.S. I'm going away for a week so if you want to continue with this I'll reply again when I'm back.
                Last edited by Bede; 05-14-2015, 01:38 AM.

                Comment


                  #23
                  'Laws are for the obedience of fools, and the guidance of the wise.' Old English Proverb

                  The problem is, the fool thinks himself wise, and the wise know themselves fools.

                  I do not think there is a simple answer to this question; which law should we obey, and which disobey. I think we need follow our conscience, in all things, and learn by our errors.

                  Best wishes, 2RM.
                  Last edited by 2ndRateMind; 07-02-2015, 05:34 AM.

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Originally posted by Cornelius View Post
                    Jesus didn't add to the law, nor remove any law. Looking at a woman with a desire for adulterous acts makes someone an adulterer (else, there would be no desire for adulterous acts). This wasn't a change to the law, just an assertion of the full application of the law. You're not righteous if you just follow the law outwardly, but you must also follow the law inwardly. Human laws are (should be) only concerned with outward acts. But, God's law really is about that which is eternal, and the flesh is not eternal.

                    Ceremonial laws haven't passed away. So, why may Christians eat pork? Because ceremonial laws aren't strictly prohibitions in the first place. These laws are recognized by the fact that they do not have criminal consequences, but rather cause uncleanliness. In Moses's camp, you could eat pork all day long and not get into any legal trouble, you'd just be ceremonially unclean. There was nothing wrong, per se, with being ceremonially unclean, aside from the duty to become ceremonially clean.

                    Priests, with God's blessing, could become unclean around dying family members. Women, through no fault of their own, would become unclean during menstruation. Like a Christian dutifully obtaining water baptism, an Israelite would dutifully avoid pork and if failing to do so would obtain a sacrifice to become clean. Well, folks, we have our sacrifice. It's impossible for us to become ceremonially unclean, which means eating pork doesn't make us unclean.

                    Leviticus 11:7-8 And the pig, because it parts the hoof and is cloven-footed but does not chew the cud, is unclean to you. You shall not eat any of their flesh, and you shall not touch their carcasses; they are unclean to you.
                    Hi Cornelius,
                    Concerning "...ceremonial laws aren't strictly prohibitions in the first place."
                    With respect:
                    Indeed we may eat pork all day long now. As Jesus stated in John that it is not what enters you that makes one unclean. And also when in Acts, God brought down the sheet with all sorts of "unclean" animals (this of course signifying the Gentiles had been made clean). For the Gentiles had not yet been fully brought in until now, but as we know they were few, such as Rahab being a Cannanite and Ruth being a Moabite.

                    But "in the first place" they were indeed prohibitions. Yes when one would eat pork he would be made unclean, but the sin lies in ones disobedience. One does not eat pork unintentionally, I know you will agree. But a woman who has a minstration, cannot help but be unclean and so The Lord provides in His grace, instructions to be made "clean". "For you it will be unclean to eat it" means that they were to set themselves apart from what the "other nations were doing." "Be holy as I am Holy."

                    I hope I have not misunderstood you. If I have, I apologize.
                    God Bless
                    Last edited by Jason T V; 07-02-2015, 08:52 AM.

                    Comment


                      #25
                      The greatest commandments are only of 2 found in the New Testament in which I was taught by Pastor Apollo Quiboloy.

                      Mark 12:30-31
                      30 "And thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind, and with all thy strength: this is the first commandment."
                      31 "And the second is like, namely this, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. There is none other commandment greater than these."

                      If we were to just apply these two commandments we would honor our love for our one and only Almighty Father, our Lord Jesus Christ the Creator of all, and if you happen to love your neighbor as yourself there would not be any war or hate happening in the world today. Applying these 2 commandments, umbrella the commandments and laws in the Old Testament.

                      And how do we love our neighbors? (Matthew 5:43-44)
                      43 "Ye have heard that it hath been said, Thou shalt love thy neighbour, and hate thine enemy."
                      44 "But I say unto you, Love your enemies, bless them that curse you, do good to them that hate you, and pray for them which despitefully use you and persecute you."

                      Comment


                        #26
                        A list of the 613 Mitzvot (Commandments) According to the Hebrew sages, the commandments that cannot be observed today primarily relate to the Temple, and its sacrifices and services because the temple does not exist today. There are Commandments that only apply in Israel.

                        The 10 Words (Commandments) of the LORD God are a delight to follow and love. Just like what King David (the Jewish patriarchal line of the Yeshua (Jesus) prayed, "I delight to do your will, O, God. Your Law is within my heart (my innermost being)"-- NASB, CJB version).Psalm 40:8.





                        Comment


                          #27
                          Originally posted by Bede View Post
                          What do you mean by some of the OT laws still apply and some don't?

                          On what basis do you obey some and not obey others?
                          Try Acts 15.23-29. The Decalogue isn't mentioned, but I suppose they could take it granted that the recipients of their letter would have already been made familiar with that.

                          Then there is the general tenor of all Paul's epistles.

                          Comment


                            #28
                            Seems like people would Rather live by a bunch of laws / being told what to do and the consequences of disobeying --- Rather than trust a relationship with God through Jesus Christ / the Holy Spirit being our conscience / being responsible to God For our actions / choices.

                            From the Human standpoint -- relationships Can be very unstable / untrustworthy. We have a hard time trusting that God Will always be with us -- will never leave us or forsake us. That He , alone, knows what's best for each person. People can be very selfish / self-serving. And there Are negative consequences to that.

                            Everyone has a set of civil laws that we are responsible to know and obey. No matter where a person lives. And most of them are based on the Ten Commandments / common sense / Biblical morality, ethics. Though Society doesn't want to admit it. And there are those who are willing to live Outside of Any law -- simply to prove that they are capable of doing what They want to do.

                            Comment


                              #29
                              Originally posted by Bede View Post
                              Quite interesting but how many of these are laws for Christians?
                              The laws within the Torah (Pentateuch = Books of Moses = first five books of the Bible) can be broken down into at least ten categories, and the focus must always be on the first category -- which is spiritual. So when you look at those 613 laws (and that is a number commonly used, which may or may not be exact) here is what you find:

                              1. SPIRITUAL (the Ten Commandments, which are eternal and binding on all including Christians)

                              2. MORAL (e.g. Not to stand by idly when a human life is in danger )

                              3. SOCIAL (e.g. Not to intermarry with gentiles )

                              4. CIVIL (e.g. Not to withhold food, clothing or conjugal rights from a wife)

                              5. CRIMINAL (e.g. Not to spare a pursuer, but he is to be slain before he reaches the pursued and slays the latter, or uncovers his nakedness)

                              6. SACRIFICIAL (all laws pertaining to the Tabernacle, the Temple, the Sacrifices and the Levitical Priestood. These were rendered null and void on the Cross of Calvary).

                              7. CEREMONIAL (e.g. To circumcise the male offspring)

                              8. FESTIVE (all the feasts, festivals, sabbaths, new moons, and holy days are deemed to be shadows only, therefore null and void. The reality is Christ e.g. "Christ OUR PASSOVER is sacrificed for us).

                              9. DIETARY (all the dietary laws are null and void and Christians are at liberty to eat all meats with prayer and thanksgiving)

                              10. COMMANDMENTS FOR GENTILES WITHIN THE CHURCH (As per Acts 15 -- (1) consumption of blood is forbidden, (2) consumption of meats strangled is forbidden, (3) fornication is forbidden, and (4) meats offered to idols are forbidden.

                              Comment


                                #30
                                The Law has Changed.

                                The believer in Jesus Christ is under the Commands in the New Testament (that come from Jesus and His followers). However, the Mosaic Law (as a whole package deal) no longer exists. It became obsolete with Christ's death. It is obvious the Old Law does not still exist (as a whole) because various commands in the New Testament have changed what the Old Law says. For example: Paul says that if you seek to be circumcised, Christ shall profit you nothing. Jesus says to us that we are no longer to render an eye for an eye but we are to turn the other cheek. When Jesus died upon the cross, the temple veil was torn letting us know that the laws on the priesthood and the animal sacrifices were no longer valid anymore. Jesus is our Heavenly High Priest and He is our Passover Lamb. Paul says we are no longer to judge according to Sabbaths and holy days. Peter was told to eat unclean animals (Which is a violation of OT Law).

                                However, just because the OT Law is obsolete as a whole, does not mean God does not have other laws (or commands) for us today. In fact, one must understand that God has "Eternal Moral Laws" for man since after his "fall" in the Garden. After the "fall": It was always wrong to murder, commit adultery, sleep with one's parents, get drunk, hate your brother, covet, lie, commit idolatry, etc. These Moral laws existed before the written Law and they still exist today. The written Law of Moses merely repeated them or emphasized them. But in addition to these moral laws, there were laws (within the Old Law) that were exclusive to the nation of Israel. These are ceremonial laws (like the Saturday Sabbath, circumcision, the dietary laws, animal sacrifices involving a priesthood) and civil laws (like on how to manage farming etc.) and judicial laws (like regulating legal matters). There were a total of 613 Commands in the Old Testament Law of Moses. Some of these Laws are God's Eternal Moral Laws; Others are exclusively for Israel and do not apply to us. Believers today are under the New Testament (i.e. the New Covenant) with new laws (Which would include God's Eternal Moral Laws). Hebrews 7:12 says the Law has changed (along with the change of the priesthood).

                                Jesus did not come to abrogate God's Eternal Moral Laws (like do not murder, do not hate, do not commit adultery, do not steal, etc.). Jesus nailed to the cross those ordinances that were against us (like the Saturday Sabbath, the death penalty for disobeying God's laws, circumcision, the dietary laws, etc.) (See Colossians 2:14-17). Jesus says, "Think not that I am come to destroy the law, or the prophets: I am not come to destroy, but to fulfill." (Matthew 5:17). So Jesus did not come to destroy all Law and it's consequences but He came to fulfill them into their true intended purpose with the commands given to us within the New Testament. These many commands in the NT are based on love. Love God and love your neighbor.

                                Comment

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