Apologetics may be simply defined as the defense of the Christian faith. The word "apologetics" derives from the Greek word apologia, which was originally used as a speech of defense.

The Petra we stand on. Was it a grammatical issue that caused the schism of 1054?

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    The Petra we stand on. Was it a grammatical issue that caused the schism of 1054?

    Recently, i was just browsing through a post of /christian/, and as it typically goes, the post becomes a sh**fest about papal supremacy, but there was an Orthobrox that gave a link full of biblical arguments against the R.Catholic church's authority. One of the link's case demonstrates that for Matthew 16:18 there a definitional distinctions between in Greek for Peter; Petros meaning a small individual stone-masculine(like the ones R.catholics enjoy throwing at our windows), and the 'Rock'; Petra which means rock of a large mass-feminine(it also can refer to a cliff or a boulder).

    This contrast conceptually makes perfect sense for other verses such as 1 Corinthians 10:4, 1 Peter 2:4-8, etc. as they utilize the term Petra to illustrate the notion that people are the stones(Petros) for the temple of God with Christ as our foundation(Petra). But I researched farther, the Latin Vulgate 'conveniently' omits these characteristics like that of the Greek, with the latin word for 'Rock'(petram) as a very generic description for a stone, and 'Peter' is just a name(Petrus). Although St.Jerome, St.Augustine, and others, seemly understood the Greek translation.

    f I properly did my research, then here my question: Do you think this division of language between the East, who spoke primarily Greek, and the West, who increasing only spoke Latin, helped to motivate the papal divergence within the schism of 1054? P.S. Please forgive me if I made any grammatical mistakes. English isn't my strongest subject.



    #2
    Originally posted by The_Cheeky_Guardian View Post
    Recently, i was just browsing through a post of /christian/, and as it typically goes, the post becomes a sh**fest about papal supremacy, but there was an Orthobrox that gave a link full of biblical arguments against the R.Catholic church's authority. One of the link's case demonstrates that for Matthew 16:18 there a definitional distinctions between in Greek for Peter; Petros meaning a small individual stone-masculine(like the ones R.catholics enjoy throwing at our windows), and the 'Rock'; Petra which means rock of a large mass-feminine(it also can refer to a cliff or a boulder).

    This contrast conceptually makes perfect sense for other verses such as 1 Corinthians 10:4, 1 Peter 2:4-8, etc. as they utilize the term Petra to illustrate the notion that people are the stones(Petros) for the temple of God with Christ as our foundation(Petra). But I researched farther, the Latin Vulgate 'conveniently' omits these characteristics like that of the Greek, with the latin word for 'Rock'(petram) as a very generic description for a stone, and 'Peter' is just a name(Petrus). Although St.Jerome, St.Augustine, and others, seemly understood the Greek translation.

    f I properly did my research, then here my question: Do you think this division of language between the East, who spoke primarily Greek, and the West, who increasing only spoke Latin, helped to motivate the papal divergence within the schism of 1054? P.S. Please forgive me if I made any grammatical mistakes. English isn't my strongest subject.

    I haven't anything to add, but I'm sure Origen can answer your question (is an expert in the Greek, Hebrew and loves history). Just wanted to step in and say hello and welcome you to Christforums The_Cheeky_Guardian!

    God bless,
    William
    Comment>

      #3
      Thank you, William. Glad to be here.
      I'm certain that Origen will come around.
      Comment>

        #4
        As to the 1054 schism, Dr. Reeves (PhD in Historical Theology from Cambridge, Professor of Historical Theology at Gordon-Conwell) does an excellent job of of addressing the issues. One should not think that all the issues were simply theological. There were also political issues.

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