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William

"WORLD" - John's Ten Uses of the Word

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by Pastor John Samson

 

The word world κόσμος (Greek: Kosmos) appears 185 times in the New Testament: 78 times in John, 8 in Matthew, 3 in Mark, and 3 also in Luke. The vast majority of its occurrences are therefore in John's writings, as it is also found 24 times in John's three epistles, and just three times in Peter.

 

John uses the word world in ten different ways in his Gospel.

 

1. The Entire Universe - John 1:10; 1:3; 17:5

 

2. The Physical Earth - John 13:1; 16:33; 21:25

 

3. The World System - John 12:31; 14:30; 16:11 (see also similar usage in Gal 1:4 Paul)

 

4. All humanity minus believers - John 7:7; 15:18

 

5. A Big Group but less than all people everywhere - John 12:19

 

6. The Elect Only - John 3:17

 

7. The Non-Elect Only - John 17:9

 

8. The Realm of Mankind - John 1:10; (this is very probably the best understanding of the word "world" in John 3:16 also)

 

9. Jews and Gentiles (not just Israel but many Gentiles too) - John 4:42

 

10. The General Public (as distinguished from a private group) not those in small private groups - John 7:4

 

Seeing this list can be very helpful, especially when traditions reign supreme in some people's minds that "world" always means all people everywhere. Sometimes it does, but most of the time, it does not. It is a tradition that is very strong but one that cannot survive biblical scrutiny. It is the context that always establishes the meaning of words and their usage.

 

Source: http://www.reformationtheology.com/2..._of_the_wo.php

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Interesting post - thanks for the share.

 

I am especially interested in John 3:16 & John 17 and I glad John Samson notices the difficulty of understanding here, does John (the writer) really employ the same word with different meanings in such a small space.

 

I have always understood that text to be contrasting the world with Israel - Having just spoken of how the bronze serpent was lifted and all who looked to it were saved, the conversion continues to Jesus' mission - he is going to lifted up and whoever looks to him will be saved. This isn't a passage dealing with the process of salvation at all, rather it is a passage explaining to a Jew the broadness of salvation - it is for the world, ie Jew and Gentile. There is no implication that everyone will look, and there is no implication that everyone is able to look - the implication is that salvation Jesus came to win is for the world, and not the Jews.

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by Pastor John Samson

 

The word world κόσμος (Greek: Kosmos) appears 185 times in the New Testament: 78 times in John, 8 in Matthew, 3 in Mark, and 3 also in Luke. The vast majority of its occurrences are therefore in John's writings, as it is also found 24 times in John's three epistles, and just three times in Peter.

 

John uses the word world in ten different ways in his Gospel.

 

1. The Entire Universe - John 1:10; 1:3; 17:5

 

2. The Physical Earth - John 13:1; 16:33; 21:25

 

3. The World System - John 12:31; 14:30; 16:11 (see also similar usage in Gal 1:4 Paul)

 

4. All humanity minus believers - John 7:7; 15:18

 

5. A Big Group but less than all people everywhere - John 12:19

 

6. The Elect Only - John 3:17

 

7. The Non-Elect Only - John 17:9

 

8. The Realm of Mankind - John 1:10; (this is very probably the best understanding of the word "world" in John 3:16 also)

 

9. Jews and Gentiles (not just Israel but many Gentiles too) - John 4:42

 

10. The General Public (as distinguished from a private group) not those in small private groups - John 7:4

 

Seeing this list can be very helpful, especially when traditions reign supreme in some people's minds that "world" always means all people everywhere. Sometimes it does, but most of the time, it does not. It is a tradition that is very strong but one that cannot survive biblical scrutiny. It is the context that always establishes the meaning of words and their usage.

 

Source: http://www.reformationtheology.com/2..._of_the_wo.php

 

Just a comment on your number 6 - so do you believe that teh elect only have a possibility to be saved instead of really being saved? The word saved (or might be saved more correctly) is in the aorist passive subjunctive which means only a potential or possibility.

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Just a comment on your number 6 - so do you believe that teh elect only have a possibility to be saved instead of really being saved? The word saved (or might be saved more correctly) is in the aorist passive subjunctive which means only a potential or possibility.

 

I think I have addressed that in my post - the subjunctive can be used to describe 'potential' - take this English example 'Should I get sick, I would not be able to go to work.' that is a phrase of certainty if certain criteria are met :RpS_smile:

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Just a comment on your number 6 - so do you believe that teh elect only have a possibility to be saved instead of really being saved? The word saved (or might be saved more correctly) is in the aorist passive subjunctive which means only a potential or possibility.

 

I think I have addressed that in my post - the subjunctive can be used to describe 'potential' - take this English example 'Should I get sick, I would not be able to go to work.' that is a phrase of certainty if certain criteria are met :RpS_smile:

Well I was asking william but thank you for answering. Now you are assuming that the simple statement is loaded with many many criteria to make it a certainty. I think God would have inspired an actual and no t apotential verb.

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Just a comment on your number 6 - so do you believe that teh elect only have a possibility to be saved instead of really being saved? The word saved (or might be saved more correctly) is in the aorist passive subjunctive which means only a potential or possibility.

 

I think I have addressed that in my post - the subjunctive can be used to describe 'potential' - take this English example 'Should I get sick, I would not be able to go to work.' that is a phrase of certainty if certain criteria are met :RpS_smile:

Maybe you can help me. Wiliam and Origen have posted on my subscription (that is all it says) How do I get to those posts to know what is being said??

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Just a comment on your number 6 - so do you believe that teh elect only have a possibility to be saved instead of really being saved? The word saved (or might be saved more correctly) is in the aorist passive subjunctive which means only a potential or possibility.

 

I think I have addressed that in my post - the subjunctive can be used to describe 'potential' - take this English example 'Should I get sick, I would not be able to go to work.' that is a phrase of certainty if certain criteria are met :RpS_smile:

It's post number 2 - just up a couple

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Just a comment on your number 6 - so do you believe that teh elect only have a possibility to be saved instead of really being saved? The word saved (or might be saved more correctly) is in the aorist passive subjunctive which means only a potential or possibility.

 

I think I have addressed that in my post - the subjunctive can be used to describe 'potential' - take this English example 'Should I get sick, I would not be able to go to work.' that is a phrase of certainty if certain criteria are met :RpS_smile:

I do not think that is what it means. It is in my message center and here is what it says:

William William and -1 others have posted on your subscription:

 

No mention of which subscription.

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Just a comment on your number 6 - so do you believe that teh elect only have a possibility to be saved instead of really being saved? The word saved (or might be saved more correctly) is in the aorist passive subjunctive which means only a potential or possibility.

 

I think I have addressed that in my post - the subjunctive can be used to describe 'potential' - take this English example 'Should I get sick, I would not be able to go to work.' that is a phrase of certainty if certain criteria are met :RpS_smile:

William William and -1 others have posted on your subscription

 

Means those posts were removed and explains why you cannot see them.

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Just a comment on your number 6 - so do you believe that teh elect only have a possibility to be saved instead of really being saved? The word saved (or might be saved more correctly) is in the aorist passive subjunctive which means only a potential or possibility.

 

I think I have addressed that in my post - the subjunctive can be used to describe 'potential' - take this English example 'Should I get sick, I would not be able to go to work.' that is a phrase of certainty if certain criteria are met :RpS_smile:

Thank you William. I did not want to appear rude and ignore a post.

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