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TonyT

Is Harry Potter a satanic attempt to make people Envious

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I will not lie, I have never really read the books because my father didn't want me to growing up (Exodus 20:12); but I feel a bit envious of people who have read it. I know that even though I have grown it is still a sin for someone to read these books according to Exodus 22:18 "Thou shalt not suffer a witch to live. (KJV)" and Jeremiah 10: 2 "Thus saith the Lord, Learn not the way of the heathen, and be not dismayed at the signs of heaven; for the heathen are dismayed at them." (KJV) How do I deal with this struggle that I have and the feeling of being left out of never reading Harry Potter?

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It's not really a bad thing to be left out or not fit in. Think about all the bad you might have missed out on that other people went through because of the things they did. People who have never had sex with two partners might feel like they are missing out, but what they are really missing out on is a painful STD.

 

And your not missing out on anything that great, the books are just the more detailed version of the movies. There's no life lessons to learn form Harry.

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My wife and I felt the books and movies contained material incompatible with Biblical teaching. There were, in our opinion, cultic charactor's that made it unacceptable for our Christian home. Parents must make choices that may or may not be in line with other Christian;s assent. We are required to look carefully for un-biblical information or charactors in movies intended for each one of us.

 

Movies rated as R we avoid, as usually they contain sex and violence which is unacceptable

 

 

justme

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I am probably going to be approaching this from an uncommon direction around these parts, but I grew up on classic tales of myths and heroes. King Arthur and his Knights of the round Table, the Sword in the Stone, Hercules, Odysseus. Heroes fight multi-headed dragons and use enchanted swords and have Merlin to advise them. Peter Parker gets bitten by a radioactive spider and becomes Spider Man. Tolkein brought us enchanted lands full of elves and dwarves and wizards. It was all fantasy and it was all just for fun. So I had no problem with Harry Potter from that perspective. I read and enjoyed the first book ... sort of Oliver Twist meets The Sword in the Stone with the boy becoming a young Merlin instead of a young Odysseus. I progressively disliked each book more than the last because they were bad literature. The stories went from being a coming of age tale of hope and adventure to a Shakespearean tragedy with ever darker plots and ever greater violence. Who wants to read about heroes slowly being killed off?

 

So I don't really know or care how either the books or movies end, nor do I care about any future sequels. I like Dickens, where the hero overcomes adversity and the villain gets his comeuppance more than Shakespeare, where nobody wins and everyone dies. In the First Harry Potter book, you missed Oliver Twist with magic. In the other books, you just missed a bunch of Shakespearean Tragedies with magic. Read "Oliver Twist" by Charles Dickens and rent "The Sword in the Stone" by Disney and you will be ahead of the game.

 

Setting aside the fact that it is no fun to read, the basic plot is an epic struggle between Good and Evil that requires Good to be willing to exhibit self-sacrifice to defeat the forces of Evil. The author (Rowlings) was attempting to portray christian themes, she was just too dark, heavy handed and full of herself to create a fun story. Its success is due to Scholastic marketing the heck out of it with young readers.

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Ms. Rowlings is not a Christian. Watching a interview with her on TV left us with the opinion we were glad we took the position we did.

 

Atpollard just wondering did you read much of the Bible as well? I am not looking to question you view point, but just wondering.

 

 

justme

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Ms. Rowlings is not a Christian. Watching a interview with her on TV left us with the opinion we were glad we took the position we did.

 

Atpollard just wondering did you read much of the Bible as well? I am not looking to question you view point, but just wondering.

 

justme

Yeah, I can beleve that she is not a Christian. I know she was deliberately attempting to employ 'christian themes' like good vs evil and some messianic imagery and a sense of the Harry being 'christ-like' (small c) where he is more than other people, fated to die, sacrifice himself to stop the 'evil incarnate'. I heard Harry even comes back from the dead, but I stopped caring long before the end of the third book ... so I could have misunderstood something I heard. Yet she seriously messes up the Christian Worldview and the result is more of a christianesque mythology. The character of the story dramatically changes after the first book. There is no hint of this mythology in the first book (which is more about a poor boy goes to a british boarding school and learns to use his superpowers ... typical adolescent fiction common from Grimm's Fairy Tales to Disney's Sword in the Stone to the average Comic Book).

 

I grew up reading almost none of the Bible. The few Sunday School classes I remember treated it like more of a fable than most children's stories treat real fables. Noah sailing with all of the happy animals. Jesus acting like Santa at a mall and saying "let the little children come to me."

I read the Bible after I got saved (and before the First Harry Potter book came out). I read it cover to cover, but as a new Christian, I'll admit the NT made a lot more sense than the OT [and someone needs to seriously edit out those stupid lists of geneologies and ledgers of how many napkins there were in the tent of meeting. I think it was the geneology of Chronicles that proved one of the greatest tests of "did I really want to be a Christian and read this whole Book or just become Catholic and do what the Priest says. :RpS_blink:

 

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This video seems pretty convincing to me. I've heard before that the books and movies are supposed to symbolize Christ, how that is, is beyond me.

 

https://youtube.com/IktlAUzwj5c

 

Edit: Forget the video. Harry Potter bares a strong resemblance to a young satanic magician named Alestor Crowley. Crowley claimed that he discovered he was special at the age of 11 the same as Harry, because of a mark on his chest that looked like a swatsica. Harry's mark is lightning bolt, a common symbol used by satanist. The most surprising symbolism is when Harry meets a talking snake.

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I've heard before that the books and movies are supposed to symbolize Christ, how that is, is beyond me.

Come on ...

Harry is destined to DIE so that EVIL will be defeated, but Harry comes back to life after giving his life to save the world.

 

[You really have NO idea how that might symbolize Christ?]

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Come on ...

Harry is destined to DIE so that EVIL will be defeated, but Harry comes back to life after giving his life to save the world.

 

[You really have NO idea how that might symbolize Christ?]

 

I dont know the story that well. Didn't the terminater do that too?

Besides that is there anything else that symbolizes Christ? Does the movie lead people to Christ is a better question. The movie is about using magic which is forbidden by God, that seems to me that there wasn't much thought about Christ in making the story.

 

Now we could say Christ is symbolized in lots of movies, like any movie where the hero is self sacrificing.

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Besides that is there anything else that symbolizes Christ?

Yes, but it is pretty distorted.

 

Does the movie lead people to Christ is a better question.

Definitely, not. That was why I referred to it as a 'christianesque mythology'. It sort of, kind of resembles the story of Christ in some ways, but it definitely misses the mark and just doesn't really grasp the heart of Christianity.

 

I guess it could be described as a Wordly attempt to tell a Messianic story.

It just needs to be kept in perspective. It is a bad book that made a bad movie. It is not wholesome Christian entertainment. It is also not a tutorial on witchcraft. If Christians overreact, we loose credibility.

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Yes, but it is pretty distorted.

 

 

Definitely, not. That was why I referred to it as a 'christianesque mythology'. It sort of, kind of resembles the story of Christ in some ways, but it definitely misses the mark and just doesn't really grasp the heart of Christianity.

 

I guess it could be described as a Wordly attempt to tell a Messianic story.

It just needs to be kept in perspective. It is a bad book that made a bad movie. It is not wholesome Christian entertainment. It is also not a tutorial on witchcraft. If Christians overreact, we loose credibility.

 

I don't think it's a tutorial on witchcraft, but it makes magic appealing to children and teens.

 

 

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I don't think it's a tutorial on witchcraft, but it makes magic appealing to children and teens.

It does.

So did J.R.R. Tolkein.

When did Comic Books first introduce superheroes with super powers?

Ever read Greek Mythology ... Hercules. Achilles. Odysseus.

Something that marks the protagonist as 'special' and some how better than normal is innate in the "heroes journey" at the core of most literature (ancient and modern). What I find more troubling are the stories that reverse good and evil. The vampire hero defends against the religious cabal that wants to kill them. TV is full of those sort of shows slowly teaching that evil is good and good is evil. Harry Potter is overwhelmingly secular, but it still portrays two great forces of good and evil locked in a battle and the heroes are good and employ moral and noble means, while the villains are evil and employ sinister means. It is at least a story where the reader is expected to root for good and cheer the defeat of evil. The whole element of 'magic' in the story is really just about making the important characters into superheroes and supervillains.

 

There is FAR worse on network television.

 

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It does.

So did J.R.R. Tolkein.

When did Comic Books first introduce superheroes with super powers?

Ever read Greek Mythology ... Hercules. Achilles. Odysseus.

Something that marks the protagonist as 'special' and some how better than normal is innate in the "heroes journey" at the core of most literature (ancient and modern). What I find more troubling are the stories that reverse good and evil. The vampire hero defends against the religious cabal that wants to kill them. TV is full of those sort of shows slowly teaching that evil is good and good is evil. Harry Potter is overwhelmingly secular, but it still portrays two great forces of good and evil locked in a battle and the heroes are good and employ moral and noble means, while the villains are evil and employ sinister means. It is at least a story where the reader is expected to root for good and cheer the defeat of evil. The whole element of 'magic' in the story is really just about making the important characters into superheroes and supervillains.

 

There is FAR worse on network television.

 

Yes, there's a show call Lucifer on one of the big name chanles. And there's a few other shows like The Flash, and Arrow, not long ago the preview for one of those shows pictured two women kissing. The slogan used for these shows is "Dare to defey", that the agenda they push onto teens and young adults.

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Alright, I just signed up here today and my brain is really starting to hurt from figuring everything out in general, but I might be in the minority here but I actually love Harry Potter and I don't find it satanic in the slightest? Why you might ask? Well watch this video and find out. It's not me, but it gives out good reasoning.

 

 

 

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Alright, I just signed up here today and my brain is really starting to hurt from figuring everything out in general, but I might be in the minority here but I actually love Harry Potter and I don't find it satanic in the slightest? Why you might ask? Well watch this video and find out. It's not me, but it gives out good reasoning.

 

 

 

 

Hi, welcome to Christ forums.

 

Scripture is clear that God hates sorcery, I understand that Harry Potter is fictional sorcery, but what about fictional murder or fictional adultery? All these stories glorify what God hates.

 

I haven't watched the video yet, I'll do that now.

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Alright, I just signed up here today and my brain is really starting to hurt from figuring everything out in general, but I might be in the minority here but I actually love Harry Potter and I don't find it satanic in the slightest? Why you might ask? Well watch this video and find out. It's not me, but it gives out good reasoning.

 

 

 

 

I already touched on the first point she made. Now, for the second. Harry Potter gives children an interest in magic, which is evil. Any responsible parent should take care in what they expose their children to.

 

 

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Movies, cartoons everything Hollywood seems to have their demons attached to them. I mean Thor, give me a break. Satan, the god of this world, has got his hand in all the entertainment. Our children are bombarded with pagan gods of Greece, Rome and Norse persuasion. We even have oriental gods coming up in movies and anime (especially evil). The devil knows he has a short time left, and he is raging. :RpS_angry:

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I already touched on the first point she made. Now, for the second. Harry Potter gives children an interest in magic, which is evil. Any responsible parent should take care in what they expose their children to.

What of her question about "Narnia" and "Lord of the Rings", both considered Christian Allegories by Christian writers and rife with magic?

Should we be prohibiting our children from reading these as well?

 

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I already touched on the first point she made. Now, for the second. Harry Potter gives children an interest in magic, which is evil. Any responsible parent should take care in what they expose their children to.

What of her question about "Narnia" and "Lord of the Rings", both considered Christian Allegories by Christian writers and rife with magic?

Should we be prohibiting our children from reading these as well?

I don't know enough about The Chronicles of Naria to say much on it. And is Lord of the Rings really something for children?

 

I don't see how those are Christian movies or books when they don't contain anything about Christ, except for some possible symbolism.

 

Anyhow, the topic is Harry Potter, a story which shows embrace of magical powers.

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I didn't mind the first couple of Harry Potter books, but after that I lost interest (I might suspect that's around the time she got rid of her editor). The difference is that Harry Potter glorifies magic - it shows it as desirable and an easy way to solve problems or doing your chores like washing up. Narnia and The Lord of the Rings show magic being used, but also as something dangerous and that can be corrupting, something to be avoided or destroyed rather than sought after. The Lord of the Rings wasn't really for children, although the prequel book The Hobbit was an attempt at a fairytale.

 

As far as I knew,

I don't see how those are Christian movies or books when they don't contain anything about Christ, except for some possible symbolism.
The final Narnia book "The Last Battle" makes it quite clear at the end that the Aslan/Jesus link isn't just symbolism. It's also the only line in the books where the word He is capitalised, and to a Christian like C.S.Lewis there is only one being who gets that distinction. I don't want to spoilt it, but I'll add the line here.

 

"And as He spoke, He no longer looked to them like a lion; but the things that began to happen after that were so great and beautiful that I cannot write them.” - C.S. Lewis (Full paragraph quote here)

 

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I actually love Harry Potter and I don't find it satanic in the slightest

I liked the Harry Potter books and movies too, but I also realize that being too interested in them would make it easy for a person to neglect reading the Bible and serving God. It is easy to see why you don't see anything Satanic in them. Satan is very good at disguising himself.

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I think it needs to be said that just because a character dies and comes back doesn't make them a Christ type hero. Like in Harry Potter and Lord of the Ringsthe characters who die and come back don't have any control over the matter like Christ had the authority to lay down his life and raise it up again. The only ones that are saved in both stories are the good guys, yet Christ died for sinners deserving of eternal punishment.

 

 

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I didn't mind the first couple of Harry Potter books, but after that I lost interest (I might suspect that's around the time she got rid of her editor). The difference is that Harry Potter glorifies magic - it shows it as desirable and an easy way to solve problems or doing your chores like washing up. Narnia and The Lord of the Rings show magic being used, but also as something dangerous and that can be corrupting, something to be avoided or destroyed rather than sought after. The Lord of the Rings wasn't really for children, although the prequel book The Hobbit was an attempt at a fairytale.

 

As far as I knew, The final Narnia book "The Last Battle" makes it quite clear at the end that the Aslan/Jesus link isn't just symbolism. It's also the only line in the books where the word He is capitalised, and to a Christian like C.S.Lewis there is only one being who gets that distinction. I don't want to spoilt it, but I'll add the line here.

 

"And as He spoke, He no longer looked to them like a lion; but the things that began to happen after that were so great and beautiful that I cannot write them.” - C.S. Lewis (Full paragraph quote here)

 

Lord of the Rings shows that the use of magic could be good or bad, true, but there's a movie called The Craft that has the same principle, I don't know if you seen it or not, but it's about a group of girls in high school who get together and practice witchcraft, one girl becomes abusive with her magic and eventually turns on the other girls in her coven. In the end they defeat bad witch by using the same magic. ​​​​

 

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I don't see the point here. There is no satanic attempt to do anything more than any other means of influencing others, which is part band parcel of the culture of capitalism and advertisements. We are talking about ideals and ideas here, that has everything to do with making people want to come back and see more, buy more and bring what is out there, into our lives,

 

What these books are is the same thing as the next fashion craze or the next flavor of the week in the entertainment industry. You can embrace it or walk right on past it. As far as envying the lifestyle, I don't think that witchcraft is anything like the Herry Potter series and I think that without any discipline anything that looks shiney and new will attract people like a moth to a flame.

 

Envy and seduction is what these people do, because they want to make it in this life. I don't think that J. K. Rowlinga thought any more about her story, when she first started writing it on that napkin, than any other as[iring author did or will do. She had no intention of promoting anything other than a story that had been running in her head.

 

What is the issue here is the lack of willpower and responsibility of adults to parent their kids in a way that brings perspective in the minds of our youth, no matter how old these youths are. I've seen 60 year old men act with all the discipline of a 4 year old.

 

It's not satanic, It's having a life and a purpose to live that life by. We, as Christians have that purpose/

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I don't see the point here. There is no satanic attempt to do anything more than any other means of influencing others, which is part band parcel of the culture of capitalism and advertisements. We are talking about ideals and ideas here, that has everything to do with making people want to come back and see more, buy more and bring what is out there, into our lives,

 

What these books are is the same thing as the next fashion craze or the next flavor of the week in the entertainment industry. You can embrace it or walk right on past it. As far as envying the lifestyle, I don't think that witchcraft is anything like the Herry Potter series and I think that without any discipline anything that looks shiney and new will attract people like a moth to a flame.

 

Envy and seduction is what these people do, because they want to make it in this life. I don't think that J. K. Rowlinga thought any more about her story, when she first started writing it on that napkin, than any other as[iring author did or will do. She had no intention of promoting anything other than a story that had been running in her head.

 

What is the issue here is the lack of willpower and responsibility of adults to parent their kids in a way that brings perspective in the minds of our youth, no matter how old these youths are. I've seen 60 year old men act with all the discipline of a 4 year old.

 

It's not satanic, It's having a life and a purpose to live that life by. We, as Christians have that purpose/

Witchcraft ideas put ideas in kids to conger up doing the same things. Any suggestion of introducing children or teens into the dark side in wrong.

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