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NetChaplain

That Wrongful Feeling  

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The more we learn of God’s goodness the more sensitive and aware we are made to the indwelling sinful nature. There may often or occasionally be a feeling of discomfort which seems to have no identity concerning its cause, yet there seems to be a noticeable uneasy sense within that tends to make us think that maybe we’ve neglected something or have done something unknowingly wrong.

 

This should take no place in our determination because there’s nothing we can do anyway that can address the forgiveness and acceptance which we already have in Christ; and equally important is the unchangeable surety we have of the Father’s forgiveness and acceptance.

 

Of course the origin of this and of all wrongfulness derives from the sinful nature, which often results in unidentified and uncomfortable awareness, similar to that of an identity-crisis. The believer needs not to do anything wrongful to result in the awareness of this uneasiness, and it’s encouraging to know that this is merely a God-given sensitivity (via the new nature and the Spirit) of the presence of the old nature, similar to that of not knowing you have a cancer and eventually becoming aware of it.

 

When a believer actually does wrongfully (which is not “willfully” Heb 10:26), the most blessed Spirit of God eventually brings this to his awareness, but solely to learn from it—and never intends anything accusative—for only the devil is the “accuser” (Rev 12:10).

 

The instructional means of enduring such situations is by waiting of the Lord, by “casting all your care on Him” (1 Pet 5:7) in knowing He has worked “all things together for good” (Rom 8:28)—to you!

 

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The more we learn of God’s goodness the more sensitive and aware we are made to the indwelling sinful nature.

 

Hello NC,

 

I often wonder about the guilt due from sin in my life. There are sins that I have confessed as wrong and awful but then some time later (weeks, months and even years) when dwelling on the holiness of God I feel I have to confess these sins again because I feel that a the first time of confession/repentance it "wasn't enough". Then I think "well, what would be enough"? But I feel I must do so anyway because the holiness of God is just so profound and so way beyond what mere words can fully describe. I know what I repent of will never be enough because we as Christians will never fully understand the magnitude of how awful our sins are. When I reach this point (which often happens) I call out to God and thank Him for the blood of Christ and His resurrection. Oh how lost I would be without Jesus.

Nothing in my hands I bring - simply to Thy cross I cling.

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Hello NC,

 

I often wonder about the guilt due from sin in my life. There are sins that I have confessed as wrong and awful but then some time later (weeks, months and even years) when dwelling on the holiness of God I feel I have to confess these sins again because I feel that a the first time of confession/repentance it "wasn't enough". Then I think "well, what would be enough"? But I feel I must do so anyway because the holiness of God is just so profound and so way beyond what mere words can fully describe. I know what I repent of will never be enough because we as Christians will never fully understand the magnitude of how awful our sins are. When I reach this point (which often happens) I call out to God and thank Him for the blood of Christ and His resurrection. Oh how lost I would be without Jesus.

Nothing in my hands I bring - simply to Thy cross I cling.

 

HI Faber, and thanks for the reply and sharing! I see repentance in the same manner as faith, it's a gift that once received it's another of that which we live by. Once we acknowledge our sin to God, that we see we are guilty and that salvation from it exists only in Christ' expiation for it, we from then on are kept in a mindset of repentance concerning sin, and God know this for He is the one that keeps it in us, same for all things godly.

 

Admitting (means to confess) to Him when we see we are wrong provides assurance that we have His forgiveness (1 Jhn 1:9) because it is He who maintains this in us by His Spirit via the new nature from the Lord Jesus. Upon our initial confession during receiving faith, an attitude of repentance is established which cannot change. You know you mean it and He knows to!

 

An example of my practice is that when I see I did wrong I say to God something like this: "I admit I was wrong in doing that and thank you for showing me it, and for your forgiveness." Confession and repentance shows He's "working in you" (1 Phil 2:13), for these cannot come from any other source (Spirit via the new nature we have in and from Christ - Col 3:4,10).

 

God's blessings to your Family!

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