Jump to content

The Protestant Community

Christian and Theologically Protestant? Or, sincerely inquiring about the Protestant faith? Welcome to Christforums the Christian Protestant community. You'll first need to register in order to join our community. Create or respond to threads on your favorite topics and subjects. Registration takes less than a minute, it's simple, fast, and free! Enjoy the fellowship! God bless, Christforums' Staff
Register now

Fenced Community

Christforums is a Protestant Christian forum, open to Bible- believing Christians such as Presbyterians, Lutherans, Reformed, Baptists, Church of Christ members, Pentecostals, Anglicans. Methodists, Charismatics, or any other conservative, Nicene- derived Christian Church. We do not solicit cultists of any kind, including Mormons, Jehovah's Witnesses, Eastern Lightning, Falun Gong, Unification Church, Aum Shinrikyo, Christian Scientists or any other non- Nicene, non- Biblical heresy.
Register now

Christian Fellowship

John Calvin puts forward a very simple reason why love is the greatest gift: “Because faith and hope are our own: love is diffused among others.” In other words, faith and hope benefit the possessor, but love always benefits another. In John 13:34–35 Jesus says, “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” Love always requires an “other” as an object; love cannot remain within itself, and that is part of what makes love the greatest gift.
Sign in to follow this  
Canny

What would you do

Recommended Posts

Last year I had a very difficult decision to make, a friend of mine decided to let his life come to an end. I found him on the floor in his bedroom and he was away with the fairies. I had to call an ambulance because he was up against the door and not able to move. The problem was sorted, he had a water infection, was taken into hospital and I thought was sorted out. When I went to visit he had been moved to a cancer ward, I had no idea, his family had no idea and he decided that was the Last straw, he was in so much pain from arthritis, he lost a leg after his wife died and he had just had enough. I arranged a meeting with his solicitor and the hospital.

The hospital asked me to convince him to have treatment, knowing the man and how unhappy he was. And when the water infection cleared he was in sound mind. I know what I did, what would you have done?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Probably the same thing. Why would there be a question about it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Probably the same thing. Why would there be a question about it?

 

Probably because the type of cancer had very high success rates, and it was caught very early. He starved himself and I looked after him while he did. It does bother me a bit still. I believe I would do the same again, because I would not want anyone taking my choices away from me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Probably because the type of cancer had very high success rates, and it was caught very early. He starved himself and I looked after him while he did. It does bother me a bit still. I believe I would do the same again, because I would not want anyone taking my choices away from me.

 

I didn't understand what you'd said, apparently. You were helping him starve himself?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would have considered the value of his life greater than the amount of his pain and try to convince him of the same.

 

Now if he was dying and treatment would only prolong his life of nothing but suffering to the point where he could do nothing I would support his choice in refusing treatment. That wouldn't be the same as suicide, that would be living out the rest of life naturally in my opinion. But I can't support or assest suicide just to spare someones dignity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Probably because the type of cancer had very high success rates, and it was caught very early. He starved himself and I looked after him while he did. It does bother me a bit still. I believe I would do the same again, because I would not want anyone taking my choices away from me.

 

Many Christians believe we are not to end our own lives, but I have a different view. I saw my mother and mother-in-law die horrible deaths when the means was available to save them from suffering. Now I am older and wish I had the means to choose to go easily. There are times when a decision should be left up to an individual about whether they want to continue in a life of pain and anguish. No one should have the right to decide for another. There is also a greed factor: of course homes don't want an individual to die that they can squeeze money out of. My cousin was in one and called me crying because they refused to let her leave. I called the director and she tried bullying me and I stood up to her and told her to let her leave. She did when she saw I wasn't going to fall for her manipulation. There are immoral people in positions where they want to get control of someone's assets.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like @saint I've seen someone in my own family go through this. Instead of being allowed to pass quietly in his sleep at home, he ended up passing away among strangers on tubes and wires because the medical staff did not respect his wishes or his family's and continued the treatment even when there was no hope of recovery or even pain management. That was inhumane.

 

I'm a firm supporter of pallative care if a condition is untreatable. Sometimes that does mean a patient receives a higher than safe dose of medications or painkillers, but if the condition is already fatal and untreatable, it is having to choose between quality of life over quantity. I don't see this as suicide because it is intended to manage the condition, not to kill the patient.

 

What would I have done in your situation? If he's lost a leg, got arthritis, and now cancer, refusing treatment is his right. Chemotherapy is not easy, painless, or guaranteed to work especially with older patients. I'd have made sure he was of sound mind and making his decision rationally, and then phoned a hospice or other organisation to see what quality of life could have been managed for him in his last days and let him pass at home.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Like @saint I've seen someone in my own family go through this. Instead of being allowed to pass quietly in his sleep at home, he ended up passing away among strangers on tubes and wires because the medical staff did not respect his wishes or his family's and continued the treatment even when there was no hope of recovery or even pain management. That was inhumane.

 

I'm a firm supporter of pallative care if a condition is untreatable. Sometimes that does mean a patient receives a higher than safe dose of medications or painkillers, but if the condition is already fatal and untreatable, it is having to choose between quality of life over quantity. I don't see this as suicide because it is intended to manage the condition, not to kill the patient.

 

What would I have done in your situation? If he's lost a leg, got arthritis, and now cancer, refusing treatment is his right. Chemotherapy is not easy, painless, or guaranteed to work especially with older patients. I'd have made sure he was of sound mind and making his decision rationally, and then phoned a hospice or other organisation to see what quality of life could have been managed for him in his last days and let him pass at home.

 

I think this is a balanced and sensible approach. I believe in the rights of each individual. I recall James Dobson- who I usually like - spoke out against euthanasia and I'm afraid like a pied piper he misled a lot Christians. His argument is that it would lead to forced euthanasia. That could be a problem but right now we have forced living - no matter what level of suffering an individual lives with. When I visited my mother-in-law it broke my heart seeing dozens of elderly people slumped over in wheelchairs like zombies. The place smelled horrible and my mother-in-law was unmedicated even though I demanded she be. So those places are misery chambers similar to how the Jews were treated in Germany - it's torture. Everyone should contact legislators to ask for right-to-die laws.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
Articles - News - Privacy Policy