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William

Is God Sovereign over My Free Will?

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Welcome back to the Ask Pastor John podcast, and we begin the week with a question from Tyson. “Hello Pastor John. We met a couple of months back at a conference in Dallas. Very happy to have met you. My question: We know that God is sovereign. How does God use His sovereignty for the greater good, when our free will is in place? In other words, will God use His sovereignty to overwrite our free will at times to exemplify His perfect will? And if so, do we truly have free will?” Pastor John how would you explain it?

 

I am not sure what Tyson means by free will. And so I may not be able to answer the question if he means something by free will that I don’t believe in. So let’s try out a definition and let the Scriptures shed light on this problem. I think Tyson will get the answer he is after, at least the best I can give it.

 

The technical definition of free will that creates the controversies with those like me who believe in the sovereignty of God over the human will, not just a general statement about the sovereignty of God, but God’s sovereignty over the human will, that definition is this: Man’s will is free if he has the power of ultimate self-determination.

 

What I mean by ultimate self-determination is that no power outside of man himself has ultimate or decisive control over what a man chooses, at least not when he is acting as a moral agent who must give an account to God. Neither other people, nor influences, nor God himself has decisive control over a person’s choices. God and man and nature may have some influence, but this influence cannot be decisive. They may have a kind of causality, but not ultimate causality or decisive causality. Otherwise, the man would not be free on this definition that I am unfolding.

 

So Wesleyans and Arminians insist that for a person to believe on Christ and be saved divine influence is, indeed, necessary. They call it prevenient grace: grace that has come before our faith and, thus, influences us toward Christ. But this influence on the Wesleyan and Arminian understanding cannot be decisive. The final and decisive and ultimate cause of our believing Christ is not the Holy Spirit. It is not divine grace. It is our own input. God may get the process of conversion started, but the decisive influence is provided by ourselves. This is what is meant by free will on this definition. It is ultimate or decisive self-determination.

 

Now if that is what Tyson means in his question, I can’t answer his question because I don’t think such a thing exists anywhere in the universe except in the will of God. Only God has free will in the sense of ultimate self-determination. And here are a few of the reasons why I think that, because I don’t know whether Tyson agrees with that or not.

 

Jesus talked about why Judas did not believe on him. John 6:64–65 says, “(Jesus knew from the beginning who those were who did not believe, and who it was who would betray him.) And he said, ‘This is why I told you that no one can come to me unless it is granted him by the Father.’” In other words, no one can come to Jesus, that is, no one can believe unless God grants him the faith. Judas did not come to Jesus decisively, fully, savingly because it was not granted to him, Jesus says, by the Father.

 

Jesus takes that truth and generalizes it to all of us and says in this very verse: “No one” — not just Judas — “can come to me unless it is granted” — unless the decisive coming is granted — “by the Father.” No one has the power of ultimate self-determination to get themselves to God. God gives or withholds the power to come. Nudges to come will not save anybody. What is given by God is the coming.

 

Another reason I don’t think ultimate self-determination exists in human beings is 2 Timothy 2:24–25, where Paul says that the Lord’s servant should correct “his opponents with gentleness. God may perhaps grant them repentance leading to a knowledge of the truth.” So repentance — it is the flip side of the coin of faith, with faith on the other side of the coin and faith embraces Christ — repentance turns from embracing other false reliances. The gift of repentance is the gift of the coin. It is the gift of rejecting self-reliance and embracing Christ. It is a gift of salvation. And without the gift of God to cause us to repent and believe, none of us would be saved.

 

Another reason is that John says in 1 John 5:1, “Everyone who believes that Jesus is the Christ has been born of God.” Self-willed faith does not bring about the new birth. Just the opposite. The new birth brings about faith. Faith is, therefore, not the result of human self-determination but of the new birth.

 

One more reason among many, many more: Proverbs 21:1 says, “The king’s heart is a stream of water in the hand of the Lord; he turns it wherever he will.” No king anywhere on earth has the power of ultimate self-determination. So I don’t think such a thing exists except in God. God is ultimately self-determining, but man is not ultimately and decisively self-determining.

 

Nevertheless — and I think this gets at what Tyson is asking about — nevertheless, we are responsible, accountable for our preferences and our choices. If God is sovereign over the human will, are we responsible? Yes, we are. And the Bible says so over and over again. Our choices are our choices. They are true choices. We have a will. Our will is active. We are genuine moral agents.

 

We will, as Jesus says, “give account for every careless word” (Matthew 12:36). Indeed, all of our preferences and choices and behavior, according to Romans 14:12, we will give an account of. Each of us will give an account of himself to God. Human beings do not have ultimate self-determination and we will all give an account to God for our preferences and our choices.

 

So instead of speaking of the will as free or not, I prefer to speak of people as free or not, because that is the way the Bible does. “For freedom Christ has set us free,” Paul says in Galatians 5:1. Christians are free from the bondage to sin and from the oppressive demand of having to perform our own salvation.

 

Maybe the best way to end would be to quote this great liberation from Romans 6:17–18: “Thanks be to God.” That is so important. And that is the way we should live as believers, with a heart brimming like this. “Thanks be to God, that you who were once slaves of sin have become obedient from the heart to the standard of teaching to which you were committed, and, having been set free from sin, have become slaves of righteousness.”

 

Source: http://www.desiringgod.org/interview...r-my-free-will

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Great article.

 

My "free will" ended when I confessed Jesus as Savior. I no longer have "free will" to do my own thing. When I do my own thing now, it is sin.

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Great article.

 

My "free will" ended when I confessed Jesus as Savior. I no longer have "free will" to do my own thing. When I do my own thing now, it is sin.

 

 

 

My 'free will' became my desire to do God's Will in my life upon my accepting Jesus Christ as my Savior. I can still make the decision to go to the corner drug store for milk First and read my Bible after I get home OR read my Bible First and Then go for the milk. Or going to church or going bowling? I won't get struck dead by going bowling instead of church. Neither of those activities done or Not done will affect my salvation. Now, if I decide that going bowling is more fun than going to church and I stop going to church -- then that will affect me spiritually. But it won't ruin my salvation.

 

In fact -- decades ago -- while my husband was in Bible college -- we both had evening jobs on Saturday evening. We were so tired on Sunday mornings that we slept in -- all of a sudden we realized it had been two months since we'd been to church. The next Sunday we were back in church -- it felt a bit awkward at first. But no one 'chewed' on us -- they were glad to see us. Were we sinning by not being in church on Sunday mornings, well, we missed some blessings from hearing a good sermon and being with fellow believers. I was able to back off on Saturday evenings. I was only Supposed to work two a month and that turned into 4 for those two months. Was that sinning on our part? No, we weren't spending those Saturday evenings out running around --we were earning an income.

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I was awash in doing my own thing (free will) before I settled down with my Savior, Jesus. When the Holy Spirit got my attention, I surrendered me. I stand now embraced in and by Him. This life is not my own. My wife and I will soon be meeting Him. Glory!

 

Face to face with Christ our Savior,

Face to face what will we be,

When in Rapture we behold Him,

Jesus, the One who died for us.

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We have the freedom to do whatever we desire ... fallen man is a slave to sin and 'desires' according to our fallen nature ... the new man has a new heart with the law of God written on on it and 'desires' to do what pleases God.

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I find it interesting to challenge anybody who declares there will is completely free. My challenge to them is simply to get up the next morning and decide by your free will that you will not to sin any until the following day.

 

I say its impossible and their will is limited and not completely free.

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I find it interesting to challenge anybody who declares there will is completely free. My challenge to them is simply to get up the next morning and decide by your free will that you will not to sin any until the following day.

 

I say its impossible and their will is limited and not completely free.

 

 

 

You are equating 'free will ' with deciding to not sin when you get up in the morning and being able to Not sin until the next day. Well -- if a person can keep evil thoughts out of their mind when listening to frustrating news -- or you end up with miss-matched socks in your drawer. Or your new puppy messes on the floor and you cope with all of that with no bad thoughts or reactions Then.......

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Yes, a decision made by a human is a result of the actions of his limited will. He does not always have the ability to do as he pleases.

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Yes, a decision made by a human is a result of the actions of his limited will. He does not always have the ability to do as he pleases.

 

Hi Tugz, Luther (The Bondage of the Will), Edwards (The Freedom of the Will) , and more recently, Sproul (What is Free Will .. this is part of the series called Chosen By God), have all made excellent arguments for why that is true, especially where justification is concerned.

 

Unless acted upon by an outside force of some kind, free will = being able to chose what we "desire most"* at any given moment in time.

 

*(I love desserts. When I choose 'not' to eat them however, it means that my GREATEST desire is found in my concern for my health, rather than satisfying my sweet tooth. IOW, I am not acting 'against' my great desire for a yummy dessert, rather, I'm acting 'according' to my greater desire to be healthy .. if that makes sense).

 

Becoming a Christian in our fallen state is an insurmountable problem for us as a result, because while we may desire the benefits and blessings that God provides, we, in our fallen, selfish state, have no desire for God Himself. We are, by nature, children of wrath .. e.g. Romans 3:9-12; Ephesians 2:1-3. So God must intervene, or no one could come to faith and be saved .. e.g. Ezekiel 36:26; John 3:3; 2 Corinthians 5:17, 21.

 

Yours and His,

David

p.s. - I realize you may be aware of all of this already, but I decided posted it anyway, just in case :RpS_smile:

Edited by David Lee
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Thank you for the post.

 

I have read a lot of Luther, Edwards, and Sproul. The Bondage of the Will is the only title I have read from the post.

 

I read a lot of A.W. Pink. All good authors.

 

The will of man is no doubt limited however, God's is not. Most people have it backwards.

 

I have another thought I would like ask those of the Arminian view. If a persons will can reject God's calling; why bother praying for God to save a particular person. Rather than saying, please God save a particular person. The prayer to God should be, please God save that particular person if you can. He obviously has more power than You since he can reject Your will and keep his own will.

 

Does this make since? Is God's will able to be controlled by man's will? No it can't.

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