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Dominique

What do you think about religious conversion?

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What's your view on religious conversion? Are converts as much religious as the ones who are following the belief since birth? In other words, can a converted Christian be true to the Christ, like the one who was baptized in childhood.

Practicing religion is just a personal matter, we should not discriminate people just because they follow another religion. However, conversion creates confusion.

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Of course a converted Christian can be just as true to Christ as one born into it. If anything, in some cases their faith may be even stronger, because they chose to come into it of their own will and were not born/raised with it.

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Even someone who has been baptized as a Christian in childhood must at some point in his life make a decision to repent of his sins and trust in Christ for salvation. Many who are raised in Christian families make that decision at a young age and don't remember it, but all of us who are Christians are actually converts. The act of conversion is more obvious for someone who has not been raised as a Christian.

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Even someone who has been baptized as a Christian in childhood must at some point in his life make a decision to repent of his sins and trust in Christ for salvation. Many who are raised in Christian families make that decision at a young age and don't remember it, but all of us who are Christians are actually converts. The act of conversion is more obvious for someone who has not been raised as a Christian.

 

I agree, remission of sins is not promised at the time of baptism nor is regeneration. For the child baptized in the NT Covenant during infancy, he/she is Justified when faith is placed in its object - Jesus Christ. A faith no bigger than a mustard seed.

 

God bless,

William

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Conversion is more likely to create confusion among those who remain in the religion -- or lack of religion -- of the family and friends of the person who converts. People, all people, should have the right to choose. Trouble starts when the right to choose is resisted, especially violently.

 

As to people raised in church, there comes a turning point where the childhood assent to a parent's faith must become the adult choice to remain in the faith, and it is at that point that a lot of people raised in church fall away. Because they have been sheltered from the disasters that often result from a sinful lifestyle, they don't understand what they have been tempted into. Of course, many if not most people not raised in church don't understand the freedom that is found in true Christianity, but some of us do. It is the freedom from sin, the freedom to choose kindness, honesty and morality that makes Christianity so precious.

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If converted members were not true to the faith, Christians would not have been commanded to spread the message. So much of the New Testament is about winning converts that it is obvious how much a part of the faith that is. Whether raised in the church or brought to it, what matters is the informed decision to become part of the faith and live according to its precepts.

 

Where confusion and problems arise can be when someone raised in one faith makes the decision to leave for another and those family and friends in the old faith do not understand. I will admit I would not be happy if my child decided to leave for another faith, but cutting them off or threatening them would hardly win them back. I'd hope to simply offer them kindness, compassion, and a door that is always open if they choose to return of their own will. If nothing else, it defeats the line about how Christians are evil and intolerant that certain groups keep using.

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People have to choose their faith of their own free will. It's meaningless if they're coerced into it. We, like God, can only leave the door open, we can't force people to step through it. But we can do our best to make sure the doorway is open and welcoming and inviting.

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Practicing religion is just a personal matter, we should not discriminate people just because they follow another religion.

I really wish I knew more specifics before responding, but some of this is not necessarily true. I am not advocating a new inquisition to torture people into conversion, in that sense religion IS a personal matter and we should NOT discriminate.

 

On the other hand, practicing religion is often not JUST a personal matter. Joseph practiced the religion of honoring the one true God in the pagan land of Egypt and Pottifer and the Jailer and the Pharaoh all received blessings upon their pagan lands and businesses because of Joseph. Daniel served the true God under a despotic Babylonian and Persian leader, and those kingdoms were blessed because of it. Jacob served Laban to earn the right to marry, and even as Laban tried to cheat him, God blessed everything that Jacob touched. On the flip side, Solomon chose wives who worshiped false gods and built temples to them and joined his wives in worship ... read Ecclesiastics to see how that turned out for him. So 'religion' is not always a personal matter, because it can also affect those around you.

 

'Discriminate' is also a word that is one I agree is bad in its true and original usage, but which is often tossed about in a careless manner. If I do not drop everything and throw a ticker tape parade for someone I disagree with, I am accused of 'discriminating' against them. Let's pick an extreme example, just for illustrative purposes. If my daughter decided that she wanted to become a Wiccan and invited me to her Ordination into a full member of the Coven, would I be wrong to 'discriminate' against her by refusing to participate in any aspect of her spiritual life as a witch? I am powerless to stop her from choosing her own religious path, but I should not be expected to support it no matter what path she chooses.

 

Now let's be reasonable, If I were attending a Reformed Presbyterian Church and my daughter announced that she had decided to attend the most Liberal Methodist Church in town, I would NOT disown her. That is within the realm of tolerating different opinions. (I would secretly pray that Jesus brought her to her senses). :)

 

So all Christians are Christians.

We are called to hate no one.

However, all paths do not lead to God ... Jesus is the Way, Truth and Life ... No one can come to the Father EXCEPT through Him.

 

I hope that helps and does no harm,

Arthur

Edited by atpollard
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I hope that helps and does no harm,

Arthur

 

You crack me up.

 

If any millennial does feel harm, please proceed to your safe space.

 

God bless,

William

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As someone who is born Christian, I will shamefully admit that converts can be better Christians than born Christians because the risk they have to take like being disowned by their own family and friends. My parents are converts and they experienced a lot of discrimination because of it.

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I know some people who converts according to who they marry or who they got married to. I don't think converting to a certain religion is as easy as choosing which clothes to wear. I believe every religion needs to be respected.

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I believe every religion needs to be respected.

 

Why do you believe that? Especially during a Christian genocide committed by Islam?

 

God bless,

William

 

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I know a person who was a Hindu by birth. He had mental issues, so in order to overcome his condition he began practicing Buddhism. However, later he lefty Buddhism and became Christian. He was a regular Church goer. When I asked him why did you convert he said he became Christian to find peace. He was a good Christian. If the person converts top Christianity willingly and has deep faith on Jesus. I don't think he is different than people who were Christian since birth.

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It is better to be a convert than one born into Christianity, because at least the jump towards salvation is more obvious than for one who is already presupposed to having made the jump.

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One of the charges that God gave to the believers is to go out and gather the unbelievers and seek to make believers out of them. These people would have to be converted from being non-believers to believers for them to be able to accept the will of God. When one has come to believe in something, it means that their stance has been changed from rejection to acceptance and there is now a commitment to and acknowledgment of the new dispensation. Many Christians are not born as converts, they are eventually drafted into the acceptance of salvation mostly by persuasion.

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