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William

Texas teacher implements no-homework policy, the Internet rejoices

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A second grade teacher's no-homework policy has gone viral, thanks to a student's mother posting about it on Facebook.

 

Last week, mom Samantha Gallagher posted a note on Facebook from her daughter's teacher reading: "After much research this summer, I'm trying something new. Homework will only consist of work that your student did not finish during the school day. There will be no formally assigned homework this year."

 

Godley Elementary School teacher Brandy Young told parents research doesn't prove homework improves performance. So, she said, time after school is best spent eating dinner as a family, reading together, playing outside and getting children to bed early.

 

Gallagher said her daughter is "loving her new teacher already!" The post has more than 67,400 shares on Facebook and started a healthy conversation on Reddit: I wish this was the homework policy when I was in school.

 

The response has been overwhelmingly "supportive and positive," Gallagher said. "Many who have responded are educators themselves wanting info from Mrs. Young on how to go about implementing the policy themselves."

 

Hosburgh said her daughter had about an hour of homework each night in first grade.

 

“We plan on spending more time as a family unwinding and catching up in the evenings,” she said. “Also Brooke is interested in gymnastics and this will allow more time for that.”

 

The National PTA and the National Education Association recommends the maximum amount of homework (all subjects combined) should be 10 minutes or less per grade level per night. So, second grade students should have 20 minutes of homework per night.

 

Source: http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2016/08/23/texas-teacher-implements-no-homework-policy-internet-rejoices/89194914/

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Throughout grade school, this was how my teacher handled homework except for essays around midterms and finals. It wasn't until middle school that we were expected to do six hours of homework every night. It's probably healthier a younger child to grow with her family and develop her one interests while she's young so she can focus on learning it in high school and college. I do wish that the teachers would agree not to give more than twenty or forty minutes of homework a day instead of hours.

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A no homework policy is probably good for younger children but when they get older they need to acquire the self discipline necessary to work on their own. Assigning homework could be a way of helping them acquire this discipline.

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I think the best analogy for school is that as kids get older, if they can be shown to treat is as a job, it really helps. I do agree that as they get older they should be expected to take on more responsibility, but I remember nights in middle school on where a teacher would overload with homework as if I did not have other classes or soccer practice, etc. Things such as essays do take time and if a student has no homework and then suddenly hits college and is swamped with it, it is going to be a huge shock.

 

For the little kids, though, I think it is beneficial. Maybe more children will be less burnt out by school and actually enjoy going if this was implemented for younger students.

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No doubt there is a balance somewhere. However the truth is no two children are alike. I would suggest the education needs of the child should be the most important factor. If the child needs the extra work in order to catch up\keep up then by all means used that tool.

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I have friends that are teachers that hate having to use a cookie cutter curriculum in their classes, but also say to customize the learning process to each child like they want to is nearly impossible given class sizes and time restraints. I wonder what the solution is to that?

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Carl Rodgers (yes, the psychologist) talked about "learner-centered" or "non-directive" education. Some teachers have tried it with their students by giving them a list of learning objectives to meet by a certain time (the end of the year or the end of the semester, for example) and letting students, alone or in groups as they choose, find ways to demonstrate that they know these things. They can do worksheets, book reports, skits, art projects... whatever they want. The teacher is there to provide guidance, materials, and help as necessary. In the case studies I've read, the teachers report better student engagement, that the students retain information better and often exceed the objectives given, that classroom management is easier, and students are more proactive toward learning. The teachers also report that things are easier for them, as well. There are plenty of papers and articles on this out there. It's certainly worth researching.

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Well this is certainly some interesting news, and I will be completely honest, I have no idea what to make of it. I know that if I were still a student in school I would probably like it, although now that I think about it maybe not. If it means that more of the grade is going to be allocated to in class exams and work, that might mean that preparation of research matters less, which I think are two of my strong suits, so maybe I would not really like this. I think it makes me think of the implications of the decision, though, and I am very curious to see where this story goes. I will stay tuned, and thanks for sharing.

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Carl Rodgers (yes, the psychologist) talked about "learner-centered" or "non-directive" education. Some teachers have tried it with their students by giving them a list of learning objectives to meet by a certain time (the end of the year or the end of the semester, for example) and letting students, alone or in groups as they choose, find ways to demonstrate that they know these things. They can do worksheets, book reports, skits, art projects... whatever they want. The teacher is there to provide guidance, materials, and help as necessary. In the case studies I've read, the teachers report better student engagement, that the students retain information better and often exceed the objectives given, that classroom management is easier, and students are more proactive toward learning. The teachers also report that things are easier for them, as well. There are plenty of papers and articles on this out there. It's certainly worth researching.
That's interesting and I will check it out.

 

 

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Charter schools also take this approach. My cousins both go to a local charter school. They do not get homework, have no tests, and there are no grades. Off the bat this may cause concern but both of them are very smart for their age. The school tries to foster self learning by providing guidance and positive reinforcement to the students. I think public schools are to grade and test driven, I am not saying the charter schools are perfect either though. It has been proven that some students do not test well especially on the standardized tests that are all the rage. One of the downsides I could see with this approach is if the student ends up going to a public school after attending a charter school. I would think it would be very hard to adapt to homework, tests, and grades. I am sure curriculum in the public sector will eventually change. That being said, has anyone tried the new division they do? For the life of me I can't understand it.

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I do not know how this system works, but do children who come from a charter school have any issues getting accepted into colleges as they won't have test grades or a GPA to speak of?

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There are some conspiracy theories which claim that education is deliberately being dumbed down. One would ask why. I believe that the elite wants to create two classes. Their kids will get the best education while the kids of everyone else get dumbed education. In time the kids who don't get the best education will have to serve those who did — as slaves. Sounds unconvincing but there certainly is something brewing.

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Yikes! The word "slave" is definitely a frightening one. I know quality of education can vary depending on how the quality of life if in an area. It's a broken system, much like most of the systems in this country. I do know that every teacher I know does their absolute best (I am sure this cannot be applied to every teacher, some who are either lazy or burnt out by the system they work in); my friends often feel limited in what they can do by the regulations they are held to.

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