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LeapOfFaith89

What Do You Look For In Your Church?

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As a non-denominational Christian do you ever have trouble finding a church or do you think it's easier? Have you ever had to move and look for a new church? Do you have a checklist that you need before you become a regular attender? I grew up with a pretty old school church, so I expect pastors to stick pretty close to the bible and give it a modern context.

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When I was a kid, when my parents felt like going to church they'd go either to a Lutheran church or a Catholic, whichever was closer to where we lived. When they didn't go to church they'd still force me go to the nearest church which was about a mile away from my home — a Baptist church. No more than 40 people went to this church and what made it different was the love. The people loved each other. Every other weekend we'd go together to preach the gospel, visit the sick and comfort those who'd lose their loved ones. This is the sort of church I seek. And of course they need to preach the truth. If they don't because they are afraid [of preaching the truth] even if there's some love in that church, it's not the right church for me.

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@Smithee There is a whole lot to be said for those little churches where everyone loves each other and also supports the community, Many years ago, when my kids were little, we all went to a small Church of God, and everyone was like part of the family there.

There would be designated Sundays where most of us would go to the local nursing home after our regular church service,and we had another short service there. We all sang hymns, and the elderly people in the nursing home remembered those old-time songs, and they happily sang along with us.

Then, Pastor Reed would read from the Bible and give a short sermon, and we would pray and then sing another song or two .

The nursing home people always just loved having this special Sunday Bible service.

 

The most frustration that I have had lately is that most of the pastors do not really preach from most of the Bible. The last church that we went to, you could just about predict what the pastor was going to say, and it was the same thing every week, regardless of what his starting Bible verse was.

It was always a redemption message, and ended with an alter call.

When I was younger, we had pastors who actually had Bible studies, or preached about End Times, or other lessons that are found in the Bible. Now, most pastors seem to think that going to church is just a social occasion, and other events sponsored by the church seems to be preferred over actually studying the Bible.

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@Smithee There is a whole lot to be said for those little churches where everyone loves each other and also supports the community, Many years ago, when my kids were little, we all went to a small Church of God, and everyone was like part of the family there.

There would be designated Sundays where most of us would go to the local nursing home after our regular church service,and we had another short service there. We all sang hymns, and the elderly people in the nursing home remembered those old-time songs, and they happily sang along with us.

Then, Pastor Reed would read from the Bible and give a short sermon, and we would pray and then sing another song or two .

The nursing home people always just loved having this special Sunday Bible service.

 

The most frustration that I have had lately is that most of the pastors do not really preach from most of the Bible. The last church that we went to, you could just about predict what the pastor was going to say, and it was the same thing every week, regardless of what his starting Bible verse was.

It was always a redemption message, and ended with an alter call.

When I was younger, we had pastors who actually had Bible studies, or preached about End Times, or other lessons that are found in the Bible. Now, most pastors seem to think that going to church is just a social occasion, and other events sponsored by the church seems to be preferred over actually studying the Bible.

 

I know right! I live in California and the majority of the churches I visited are just fluff and no substance. It took forever to find my current church. The worst church I went to literally talked about Matthew for almost six months and it was so predictable. I only went because my mom doesn't like going to church alone because she feels lonely since no one ever says hello to her. That's another thing I look for along with content, I don't expect people to want to instantly get to know me but it's nice if they greet you occasionally.

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I grew up in very strict churches that had an implied dress code and a sense of formality that I knew didn't truly fit the people I knew going there.

 

An important thing to me is a feeling that I belong, just as I am, messed up flaws and all. I go to church to improve my life and my walk with God, and I don't want to feel like I have to look a certain way to attend.

 

On the flip side, it is still church, and still God, so there does need to be respect for the nature of that, too. But if I wear jeans and a nice tshirt from Monday through Saturday, God already sees me those days. Anything that I do superficially to impress people really takes away from the experience.

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I studied in a Jesuit school so all my expectations of a church and the community surrounds their ideology. I like attending modern celebrations and listening to a priest who is as progressive as me. I would sometimes listen to Latin masses as well because of the beauty of the choir. My expectations for a church group are simple really in that the people are kind, loving and open who don't judge others or bring in negative energy during celebrations.

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I studied in a Jesuit school so all my expectations of a church and the community surrounds their ideology. I like attending modern celebrations and listening to a priest who is as progressive as me. I would sometimes listen to Latin masses as well because of the beauty of the choir. My expectations for a church group are simple really in that the people are kind, loving and open who don't judge others or bring in negative energy during celebrations.

 

Just curious, how do you see "progressiveness" in Christianity? For me, I see it as a movement away from Scripture into the authority of culture and society. I'm just curious how you see it? For me, God is never changing, He is the standard bearer of morality and goodness, and His morality never changes throughout time. It is society that changes, and the measuring stick of culture and society depends on the times.

 

I must admit, I have a very difficult time identifying "liberal and progressives" as Christians. Though, I acknowledge that they profess they are Christians. I think in a lot of ways for various reasons that liberalism and progressiveness have damaged Christianity in such a manner never seen before in history.

 

God bless,

William

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As shepherd to our churches..

I want to see

1. fear of God

2. care on word of God

3. Unity with love

 

i am strongly believing these three matters can do big change in community

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This topic hits close to home for me.  I've bounced around a LOT looking for a home church and I haven't found one yet.  I like to give a new church a 'three strikes and you're out' chance.  There are a lot of things I can overlook because I think each church has its flaws, but there are some things that are just red flags for me. 

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On ‎6‎/‎29‎/‎2016 at 12:45 PM, LeapOfFaith89 said:

As a non-denominational Christian do you ever have trouble finding a church or do you think it's easier? Have you ever had to move and look for a new church? Do you have a checklist that you need before you become a regular attender? I grew up with a pretty old school church, so I expect pastors to stick pretty close to the bible and give it a modern context.

Last Sunday our ekklesia met at the home of a couple who live in a town 1 hours drive away. Some Sundays they come to us, other Sundays we go to them. We all love simple, informal, spontaneous fellowship and enthusiastically edify one another in love. Collectively we have been around in ministry, missions and leadership for decades and the Lord has brought us together out of a shared desire to promote spiritual growth amongst whosoever will believe in Jesus Christ. This couple's three grandchildren joined our gathering and participated in its dynamic, also having communion with us before we all went to a Turkish kebab & burger diner for lunch where the edifying continued with all participating over the meal. We shared the gospel with the Turkish owner who said he was thinking about becoming a Christian. Next we walked through town to a secondhand bookshop and after I scored a bargain we all went to a park and did an hours walk around a lake with lots of interactive features along the way. The blessing of God is discernible in the way we network and spend time together as friends and yokefellows, and even though hardships and difficulties present themselves we do not lose heart.

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