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William

Did Jesus ever.....

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Did Jesus ever spill a glass of water? Maybe stub His toe on a corner of furniture at night? Did Jesus ever miss the ball in a game of catch? Inquiring minds want to know!

 

Seriously, what have you? And what are the theological implications (if any)?

 

God bless,

William

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I certainly believe that Jesus did go through all those things and more. He came to this earth to live a physical life experience and he lived it in every way, so it only makes sense that such things happened to him from time to time. Of course his reaction to these minor everyday frustrations must have been a little different than the reaction that most other people would have. For example, I can only imagine what a lot of us would say on stubbing our toe, but I don't think that's the same reaction Jesus would have had.

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Luke 2:52 says, "And Jesus increased in wisdom and in stature and in favor with God and man." This shows he was fully human and had the weaknesses all humans do but not the sins. I think that while he was growing up he experienced all the things you mentioned although it is possible that he didn't when he was fully grown.

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It is highly unlikely that the Son of God stumbled or bumbled at any point in His earthly life. At the end of the day, the perfect humanity of Christ will remain a mystery, since it was always "without sin". We should always bear in mind that He was "God manifest in the flesh" (! Tim 3:16).

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And what are the theological implications (if any)?

 

Um, none.

 

Except perhaps you might wonder about the fully human part, if he did none of those things.

 

 

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I think the question creates several theological implications and I was hoping to bring them into discussion. Namely, religious perfectionism, and it's interesting that some think sin synonymous with humanity. Did Jesus have a sin nature? And if not, does this make Him any less human?

 

To note, this line of questioning got another ministry's pastor in some deep trouble, and they removed the sermon which was preached on the difference between sins and mistakes.

 

Take for example, Theo's answer reciting Luke 2:52, and asking whether Jesus had to learn to ride a horse or did he fall off from time to time? In other words was Jesus not always 100% right the first time? Or could Luke 2:52 imply incomplete knowledge and be referred to as a mistake? This would be contrary to any religious perfectionism, because it would show that not even Jesus got it right the first time.

 

On the other hand, the implications of being morally wrong or making mistakes communicates that one is misguided and to most of us "it should have been some other way". According to Hab. 1:13; Heb. 4:15 sin involves a mistake of some sort—failing to meet the mark. Jesus could not sin, because God cannot sin, and He is God incarnate. His divine nature is perfect, and a perfect being cannot make mistakes.

 

Interestingly, these questions form controversy from Gnostic writings like the Infancy Gospel of Thomas where the child Jesus is a supernatural prodigy, incapable of error though prone to fits of vengeance against adults and other children. While critical scholars have argued that Jesus made factual, theological, and even moral errors during His ministry, traditional Christians have never agreed.

 

God bless,

William

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I think the question creates several theological implications and I was hoping to bring them into discussion. Namely, religious perfectionism, and it's interesting that some think sin synonymous with humanity. Did Jesus have a sin nature? And if not, does this make Him any less human?

 

Hebrews 4.15

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Hebrews 4.15

 

Is there an actual point you wish to make? Please elaborate.

 

God bless,

William

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Is there an actual point you wish to make? Please elaborate.

 

God bless,

William

 

Jesus being fully human, and being "tempted like as we are" apparently does not involve him sinning.

 

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Jesus being fully human, and being "tempted like as we are" apparently does not involve him sinning.

 

That is correct, the verse suggest that Jesus exhibited all our weaknesses of the flesh and could sympathize with us. This of course is to be considered with the verse's ending, "without sin". God incarnate has a righteous nature, and had not innate sin to contend with. However, not only did Christ experience it through the weakness of the flesh, but He was tempted beyond what humans can be tempted. For example, He was tempted by both unbelieving Jews to perform miracles - signs and wonders. Not only them but by Satan. Something only God can do. For example, why would God not make a sign or perform a miracle if it led more people to salvation?

 

Glad you elaborated,

God bless,

William

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For example, why would God not make a sign or perform a miracle if it led more people to salvation?

 

He might do if he didn't think that complaints about the lack of a sign or wonder were just an excuse for unbelief.

 

 

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Isn't a 'mistake' a 'sin'? Big or small. Dropping a bowl on the floor is an accident -- unless we were told to leave the bowl alone, right where it is. Or one of your family members asks -- does 'this' look good on me? You don't want to hurt their feelings by saying No, but honesty is Usually better. But Not as they are going out the door. But Way back when you first saw the 'article' being worn. Maybe that color Doesn't look good on them or maybe they Do need to loose a few pounds. We might not see that as a lie -thou shalt not - but it Is. A different color Can be suggested and we Could encourage better eating habits or exercise With the person.

 

Wasn't the point of Jesus's healing / miracles to point people to the Father? He fed the 5,000 with 5 loaves of bread and two fish. God was using a small amount for big things. God can use even the smallest things for His glory.

 

Actually there Is a passage that says that we are only told of a few of Jesus' miraculous doings. If we were told All of them -- it would take books and books.

 

Being tempted is Not a sin -- Acting On it , is. When a busty woman is bending down beside you and you can see Too much, a glance can't be helped -- the 2nd look can be.

 

Jesus' Christ's humanity caused Him to be tempted -- but His divine nature kept Him from it.

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Jesus went up to a tree to grab fruit because he was hungry but found that it had none; he made a mistake.

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No He didn't. Make a mistake that is.

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I'm most certain that making a miscalculation and then getting angry at the result is a mistake Sue. Matthew 21:18-19 KJV

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I'm most certain that making a miscalculation and then getting angry at the result is a mistake Sue. Matthew 21:18-19 KJV

 

Could Jesus have been "Acting" out a "Parable"?

 

God bless,

William

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Could Jesus have been "Acting" out a "Parable"?

 

God bless,

William

 

"It was but an act thy disciples. I knew this fig tree was bare all along..." *stomach growl*

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Could Jesus have been "Acting" out a "Parable"?

 

God bless,

William

 

Probably you are already of the opinion that the answer is yes. So maybe he was echoing John the Baptist's words in Matt 3.10.

 

 

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Did Jesus ever spill a glass of water? Maybe stub His toe on a corner of furniture at night? Did Jesus ever miss the ball in a game of catch? Inquiring minds want to know!

 

Seriously, what have you? And what are the theological implications (if any)?

 

God bless,

William

 

I've often wondered if Jesus ever stepped on an ant and killed it.

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I've often wondered if Jesus ever stepped on an ant and killed it.

 

I've heard say that he was a Jew, rather than a Buddhist, but I could be wrong about that.

 

 

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I've heard say that he was a Jew, rather than a Buddhist, but I could be wrong about that.

 

 

I know the importance of nitrates and nitrites in the soil, but did Jesus teach us this or is it a case of learning though science?

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I know the importance of nitrates and nitrites in the soil, but did Jesus teach us this or is it a case of learning though science?

 

What has that got to do with anything?

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I've often wondered if Jesus ever stepped on an ant and killed it.

 

Up until your posts this thread was genuine and fruitful. If you want to contribute nothing more than sarcasm or mockery than go to another board. The OP's question is nothing more than a theological one which sparks more indepth study and tries to stimulate dialogue. For example, Can God make a stone too heavy for Him to lift, or Can God create a square circle?

 

Don't answer those questions here, but please remain on topic with this OP. If you wish to start another thread you have that option.

 

God bless,

William

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Probably you are already of the opinion that the answer is yes. So maybe he was echoing John the Baptist's words in Matt 3.10.

 

 

I believe God, that is Jesus Christ asks questions or did things in Scripture already knowing the answer, but used these instances for the opportunity to bring glory to the Father. For example, as an opportunity which leads to greater understanding/teaching, "why did God ask where Adam was" in Scripture, didn't He already know? etc.

 

On the subject, John Calvin:

 

Matthew 21:18

 

18.And returning in the morning. Between that solemn entrance of Christ, of which we have spoken, and the day of the Passover, he had passed the night in Bethany; and during the day he appeared in the temple for the purpose of teaching. Matthew and Mark relate what happened during that interval, that Christ, when coming into the city, was hungry, approached a fig-tree, and, having found nothing on it but leaves, cursed it; and that the tree, which had been cursed by his voice, immediately withered. I take for granted that Christ did not pretend hunger, but was actually hungry; for we know that he voluntarily became subject to the infirmities of the flesh, though by nature he was free and exempt from them.

 

But here lies the difficulty. How was he mistaken in seeking fruit on a tree that had none; more especially, when the season of fruit had not yet arrived? And again, Why was he so fiercely enraged against a harmless tree? But there would be no absurdity in saying, that as man, he did not know (21) the kind of tree; though it is possible that he approached it on purpose, with full knowledge of the result. Certainly it was not the fury of passion that led him to curse the tree, (for that would not only have been an unjust, but even a childish and ridiculous revenge ) but as hunger was troublesome to him according to the feeling of the flesh, he determined to overcome it by an opposite affection; that is, by a desire to promote the glory of the Father, as he elsewhere says, My meat is to do the will of my Father, John 4:34 for at that time he was contending both with fatigue and with hunger. I am the more inclined to this conjecture, because hunger gave him an opportunity of performing a miracle and of teaching his disciples. So when he was pressed by hunger, and there was no food at hand, he finds a repast in another way; that is, by promoting the glory of God. He intended, however, to present in this tree an outward sign of the end which awaits hypocrites, and at the same time to expose the emptiness and folly of their ostentation.

 

 

God bless,

William

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