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RONNIE1121

Is habitual sin forgivable?

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Many of us christians don't overlook the fact that we are all sinners.Thus we have been save thru accepting Jesus as our personal saviour.But are we amenable to cases of habitual sin. I believe if we just continue to repent and confess,every sin is forgivable.

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One cannot have both habitual sin and be a Christian. 2 Peter 2:20-22 KJV should cause all who have been called to Christ to fear and tremble. To believe one can have both repentance and habitual sin is to blaspheme against the Holy Spirit.

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@RONNIE1121 and @Trist,

 

Quick question, read 1 John 3:9 "No one born of God makes a practice of sinning, for God’s seed abides in him; and he cannot keep on sinning, because he has been born of God."

 

Here's my question, what about those struggling or striving against addictions? Don't know if anyone here understands the power an addiction can have over a person? I struggled 15 years with a drug addiction and finally kicked it seven years ago. If I were to have read some of these comments back then on the subject I'd probably of given up. But instead, my brothers and sisters in Christ prayed for me (James 5:16).

 

I believe if we just continue to repent and confess,every sin is forgivable.

 

I agree Ronnie, if one truly confesses their sin and repents of it though they struggle I believe Jesus sacrifice is greater than our sins. But I did point out 1 John 3:9, and I'd love to hear your understanding on the subject if you will?

 

One cannot have both habitual sin and be a Christian.

 

Trist, just curious, would you say a Christian is synonymous with a disciple? Here's something I learned and believe now as it lowers the blood pressure. I think one actually doesn't need to believe in God to be a Christian. I know this sounds crazy, but I think that if one is learning about God from Scripture then they are a disciple. Plenty of people consider themselves Christian, but they bear no fruit of regeneration (look at what 1 John 3:9 says). Being a born again Christian in my book is quite different than a Christian.

 

Many people struggle with sins, they struggle with habitual patterns of behavior handed down from generation to generation, my point is sanctification is not only past, present, but also future, and it can take us a lifetime to overcome our sins. I long ago quit trying to figure out who is a Christian and not. Your thoughts? Especially on 1 John 3:9? Also keep in mind 1 John 1:8 "If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us."

 

God bless,

William

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A Christian should be synonymous with a disciple but today's "Christians" could be described as a person who wants to be a millionaire yet only has three dollars and calls himself a millionaire anyways because "he is working towards his goal." Most are merely admirers of Christ, not followers, just as Christ had many admirers in the beginning of his discipleship; even Judas. For this reason Christ's life makes terrifyingly manifest what dreadful untruth it is to admire the truth instead of following it. If there were truly 2.2 billion Christians in the world, malnutrition would be a ghost story and the book of Revelation a fable.

 

Those who have drug addictions do not know Christ, for Christ was never one to run from suffering; he sought it. The Christian is one who pledges to be scourged by the Lord, he is one who embraces suffering. Those who break drug addictions and come to Christ cannot go back because they have become like children in that they are obedient and don't run from their father's belt. To see suffering as evil, rather than a byproduct of evil, is to not know Christ.

 

1 John 1:8 it is an instruction not to claim that you know something you cannot truly know, otherwise you are lying and are expressing pride. For Job was perfect (Job 1:1 KJV) and said this: "If I justify myself, mine own mouth shall condemn me: if I say, I am perfect, it shall also prove me perverse. Though I were perfect, yet would I not know my soul: I would despise my life. This is one thing, therefore I said it, He destroyeth the perfect and the wicked." (Job 9:20-22 KJV)

 

If any be discouraged, I would suggest this parable: Matthew 21:28-31 KJV.

 

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If there were truly 2.2 billion Christians in the world, malnutrition would be a ghost story and the book of Revelation a fable.
Unless as is the case, the rest of the 7.5 billion people in the world weren't. We can produce enough food to feed the world, but the armed militia, rebels and wars in Africa and the Middle East stop it getting to them, so people still starve. China and other majority non-Christian countries would object immensely to attempts to interfere in their own countries. In countries that claim they are Christian, most of the people running the governments are not, and the system is designed to make sure that those that are can be voted down by the rest. Funds are rarely put into looking after the poor in our own countries - it is more about ticking boxes than offering assistance, and if an individual does not fit those boxes they are out of luck.

 

(Apologies if I sound depressed. We've just had the church foodbank and shelter that filled those gaps for many closed by the council because they thought that homeless people gathering was a crime risk. After twenty years with no issues, it is suddenly a crime risk. They say it has nothing to do with the millions the council spent doing up their offices five streets away, and their comment that the food bank 'didn't look good'...)

 

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1 John 1:8 it is an instruction not to claim that you know something you cannot truly know, otherwise you are lying and are expressing pride. For Job was perfect (Job 1:1 KJV) and said this: "If I justify myself, mine own mouth shall condemn me: if I say, I am perfect, it shall also prove me perverse. Though I were perfect, yet would I not know my soul: I would despise my life. This is one thing, therefore I said it, He destroyeth the perfect and the wicked." (Job 9:20-22 KJV)

 

G'day Trist,

 

Besides watering down God's holiness, one must have a truly stupid conscience to vainly imagine that the faithful are in this world endued with sinless or an angelic purity. Hebrews chapter 12 speaks of God's discipline. If Christians do not sin then there is no need for discipline as no righteous God would discipline anyone without reason. If one does not know they sin and are not disciplined then I say they are an illegitimate child of God. That is, they are not saved (if taken verbatim), because the Elect know that they depend on a daily application of mercy and grace.

 

And, Job's "perfectness and uprightness" does not mean he was a sinlessly perfect man, as the rest of the book demonstrates. The designation perfect or blameless in Scripture is often used for people who, though sinners, are oriented toward loving and serving the Lord (see Gen. 6:9; Luke 1:5–7). Blameless individuals endeavor to live according to God’s commands and repent when they fall short. The blameless person, Matthew Henry comments, is like Job, who “dreaded the thought of doing what was wrong; with the utmost abhorrence and detestation, and with a constant care and watchfulness, he eschewed evil, avoided all appearances of sin and approaches to it.”

 

Furthermore, and this includes Job none are righteous without Christ, it's Jesus' imputed righteousness, the object of our faith by which we are declared so (Job 19:25).

 

God bless,

William

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