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TV tells me that moral goodness comes from buying the right brand of dog food!

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  • TV tells me that moral goodness comes from buying the right brand of dog food!

    [FONT=trebuchet ms][SIZE=16px]I never would have associated moral goodness with buying a particular brand of dog food - since I don't have a dog I guess I am utterly bereft of moral goodness because I don't have a use for any brand of dog food - but advertising experts evidently think that the buying public will swallow the association ...[/SIZE][/FONT]


  • #2
    Originally posted by peppermint View Post
    [FONT=trebuchet ms][SIZE=16px]I never would have associated moral goodness with buying a particular brand of dog food - since I don't have a dog I guess I am utterly bereft of moral goodness because I don't have a use for any brand of dog food - but advertising experts evidently think that the buying public will swallow the association ...[/SIZE][/FONT]
    What ad or brand was it for? I think the morality push comes from the idea that you are doing your best to proved the best food for your dog instead of feeding your dog garbage. It was probably more of an ad pitch towards the ego than a implication that you can actually get morality from it. I wouldn't take advertisments to seriously.
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    • #3
      People and companies in general would say anything to get their product to more people. People would claim stuff, and even take advantage of religious quotations, beliefs, or try to replicate scenes from Biblical events to get their products noticed. I never really cared though, because it has been a pretty common selling and advertising tactic since the dawn of time, and there's really nothing we can do about it. You know how many tasteless crucifixion scenes I have scene that ends up in some advertisement regarding a cleaning product or something? It's pretty ghastly to think people actually paid good money for these commercials, but that's the way the world works.
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      • #4
        Marketers often appeal to the emotions. It's easy for them to shame you into buying something more expensive if that's what will make you a good pet owner. That said, buying expensive pet food doesn't make one a good pet owner or a good person. It's pretty much the same as saying someone who gives more in church is a better person than one who gives a buck or two because that's what they can afford. In any case good deeds won't get anyone to heaven.
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        • #5
          I think that I have seen a lot more of these lately, the ones that Smithee is talking about where they appeal to the emotions, and thus to the morality of a certain product. Sometimes it comes off as desperate and a last attempt, but other times I can think of it being genuine and necessary. Nothing really particular is coming to mind but I am sure that there are example of both that I have seen out there, and I am curious to the dog food one that you are talking about. I guess it is just the new marketing technique these days.
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          • #6
            Marketing experts can only keep their jobs if what they promote works for the company that hired them. If a promotion fails, so do the promoters and so does the product. A lot of times this can be chancy, which is why marketers employ surveys and such to get opinions from the general public. They use this information that we provide to decide how to best promote the product and if morality wins the day, that's what they'll use, even if it does sound ridiculous to many of us. evidently the surveys point in that direction, which means that a considerable number of people actually DO buy products on emotion alone. Plus, when you get right down to it, the more crazy the advertisement sounds, the better you'll remember it later. For example, I still have a word-for-word recall of a completely stupid commercial that aired way back in the 1970's. (Yes, I'm THAT old.) The product in question, Calgon, still sells today... so apparently, stupid worked.
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