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Religious Hate Crimes are on the Rise

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  • Religious Hate Crimes are on the Rise

    Hate crimes against minority faiths spiked 86 percent in the last 12 months—even as analysts believe many incidents continue to go unreported.

    On May 2, the Senate Judiciary Committee sought answers from civil rights leaders and the Trump administration about the lack of reporting and why religious minorities—particularly Jewish and Muslim Americans—are a growing target.

    “Religious hate crimes against Muslims are the fastest growing category,” said committee chairman Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa. “Fear for practicing one’s religion should never happen in this country. This problem has been growing for some time, and is not new.”

    FBI data indicates hate crimes against Muslims rose 67 percent between 2014 and 2015. But Jewish Americans continue to be the most targeted for hate crimes. In the first quarter of 2017, statistics show 541 reported anti-Semitic incidents—including 161 bomb threats, an increase of 127 percent from this time last year.

    Grassley said religiously motivated hate crimes should always require a government response. Federal lawmakers and the Trump administration need to find ways to empower local communities to better report and prosecute such instances, he said.

    But according to Eric Treene, special counsel to the U.S. Department of Justice’s civil rights division on religious discrimination, part of the problem is that many local communities don’t report hate crimes to the FBI.

    “The FBI hate crime statistics are useful in identifying trends, but they rely on voluntary reporting by state and local law enforcement agencies, and are only as accurate as the identification and reporting processes that law enforcement agencies put into place and implement with all of their officers,” Treene said, noting five states don’t report hate crimes from any jurisdiction.

    Based on polling data from The Bureau of Justice Statistics, hate crimes could be far more prevalent than FBI crime data suggests, Treene added. Of the 18,000 law enforcement agencies in the country, only a small percentage consistently report complete hate crime data to the FBI. About 3,000 don’t report any hate crime figures at all.

    Hate crimes make up 4 percent of all violent crime in the United States. Race-related crimes are most common, followed by religiously motivated incidents. But the FBI also recognizes as hate crimes targeted threats or attacks against individuals based on their nationality, gender, age, or sexual orientation.

    Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., said hate crimes are particularly concerning in her home state, which saw a 78 percent increase in crimes against Muslims last year. She said the FBI reported about 5,000 hate crimes within the United States in 2016, but due to inaccurate data, Feinstein said that number could be as high as 300,000.

    Last year, the Justice Department provided training to more than 1,400 law enforcement agencies across the country on how to recognize and report hate crimes. Treene said accurate reporting is important to allocate the correct number of resources, but the agency already recognizes a religious hate crime problem and is deploying staff and resources to counter it.

    “What we’ve found is those who hate aren’t terribly discriminative of their victims,” Treene said. “If someone is angry at Muslims they will attack Sikhs, Middle-Easterners—people who look different.”

    Source: Religious Hate Crimes are on the Rise - Christian News Headlines

  • #2
    I don't agree with the beliefs of the muslims but their difference in beliefs is not a Good excuse to attack them. I will only Physically hurt someone if that person attempted to cause me a bodily harm. Also doing the first strike will be a negative representation of Christians.
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    • #3
      Originally posted by Sparky View Post
      I don't agree with the beliefs of the muslims but their difference in beliefs is not a Good excuse to attack them. I will only Physically hurt someone if that person attempted to cause me a bodily harm. Also doing the first strike will be a negative representation of Christians.
      You do realize that the worst Christian genocide is occurring now? More Christians have been murdered than the 1st century. Every five minutes there is a Christian martyred for the faith. I posted this at 11:36 PM (Moments before the 11th), just curious, do you know how many Christians have been murdered in the name of Islam between then and the time you respond?

      Lemme ask you this. Say you live across the street to me. And I tell everyone down the street and around your house to kill you and they will have much reward. Would that be considered "belief" or the first strike? If Islam teaches to kill (murder) the infidel then there are either active or passive Muslims. If a Christian does what the Lord teaches then they love their God and their neighbor (and that includes Muslims). See the conflict?

      It is like the nation of Israel surrounded by Islam. If Israel today laid down all its weapons and said peace, they'd be slaughtered. If surrounding Islamic countries laid down their weapons and said peace, there would be peace. But there hasn't been peace since the beginning of Islam.

      I dunno where you are from, Sparky, but here in America our forefathers wrote that Islam is incompatible with the West. Matter of fact, from the very creation of the United States Marine Corps, they were employed in numerous operations against Islamic pirates and the north African countries that sponsored them. Famously, Marines led an overland assault and captured the city of Derna in Tripoli in 1805 (hence the line in the Marines' Hymn, "the shores of Tripoli").

      God bless,
      William
      Comment>

      • #4
        Originally posted by William View Post
        If Islam teaches to kill (murder) the infidel then there are either active or passive Muslims.
        Not all branches of Islam teach this though. If you were to refer to the radical sects that teach that no non-Muslim should live then I would agree, but there are certain sects that don't follow these beliefs. You'll find them guarding churchs while Christians pray, and refusing to turn Christians over to fanatics. While all Muslims follow Islam, their beliefs and the emphasis that different groups put on parts of the faith are very different (just like Catholics, Protestants and Jehovah's Witnesses). For example, the Ahmadiyya sect believe that the violent parts of the faith's commandments were fulfilled and should no longer be followed - while they believe in peaceful conversion they condemn bloodshed. The fanatics often label such groups as non-muslim and target them just as they do other faiths. Action against fanatical sects I can understand, but not against those who were translators in the Iraq wars, helped against the Taliban, and who often ended up overseas because they were legitimately fleeing persecution for trying to protect others.

        The interpretation of the faith does matter. After all Israel might be surrounded by Islamic countries, but it has peace treaties with Jordan and Egypt.
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        • #5
          Originally posted by ChatterBox View Post
          Not all branches of Islam teach this though. If you were to refer to the radical sects that teach that no non-Muslim should live then I would agree, but there are certain sects that don't follow these beliefs. You'll find them guarding churchs while Christians pray, and refusing to turn Christians over to fanatics. While all Muslims follow Islam, their beliefs and the emphasis that different groups put on parts of the faith are very different (just like Catholics, Protestants and Jehovah's Witnesses). For example, the Ahmadiyya sect believe that the violent parts of the faith's commandments were fulfilled and should no longer be followed - while they believe in peaceful conversion they condemn bloodshed. The fanatics often label such groups as non-muslim and target them just as they do other faiths. Action against fanatical sects I can understand, but not against those who were translators in the Iraq wars, helped against the Taliban, and who often ended up overseas because they were legitimately fleeing persecution for trying to protect others.

          The interpretation of the faith does matter. After all Israel might be surrounded by Islamic countries, but it has peace treaties with Jordan and Egypt.
          Brigitte Gabriel said it best:



          I think there is something that is warranted today and it goes by the name of "rational prejudice". To me though, it is no wonder why people reject common sense in favor of political correctness. Instead of a people's group, culture, or religion changing its social relations or its image they instead expect others to change their perception about them.

          In other words, say I was driving down the street as a taxi cab driver at the very late hours of night in a bad neighborhood. I see someone flagging me over in a dark lit area with a hoodie over his head blaring music about the thug life from a hand held beat box. Any person in their right mind might exhibit "rational prejudice" here and decide not to endanger themselves, but to ensure that they get home nice and safe.

          Like my example of the black hip hop culture, political correctness, however, will tell us that during a Christian genocide, and the expansion of Islam that there is no warrant for rational prejudice (Just look at what has occurred while attempting to impose increased vetting). I guess what matters most is that people feel virtuous about their decision making, no matter what the consequences, to them or to others. Certain cultures, religions, etc are self destructive to a peoples, to their own peoples, and I feel no sympathy towards them whatsoever.

          Just look at the article Theo just posted elsewhere:Jakarta governor, ahok, sent to jail for blasphemy -Christforums

          People in a lot of ways get what they deserve. And not only them, but their children, and their children's children. There's no excuse for a child of God to let another come into your house, bound you, and take your goods, rape your women and murder your neighbor. That's just cowardice stupidity. And it flies in the face of the biblical doctrine of Total Depravity, that is, searching for the good in people thinking that they are really deep down righteous in nature.

          Click image for larger version  Name:	legallnsurrecton-com-o2017-let-them-eat-more-cake-open-borders-terrorism-20015576.jpg Views:	1 Size:	67.1 KB ID:	38452

          Originally posted by ChatterBox View Post
          Action against fanatical sects I can understand, but not against those who were translators in the Iraq wars, helped against the Taliban, and who often ended up overseas because they were legitimately fleeing persecution for trying to protect others.

          And how many actually served in such way? Out of all the "refugees" and "illegal immigrants" how many supported the United States, and not only that, but also did the right thing for righteousness sake?

          I'm sure we could even twist Scripture to show the righteousness of Judas in betraying Jesus for coinage. Do we even know whether the people who served U.S. interests did so for righteous reasons? Or perhaps they are for hire to the highest bidder? Exactly where do their loyalties stand? Don't know? Move them into your house then.

          God bless,
          William
          Comment>
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