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Dog Training Tips

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  • Dog Training Tips

    So, we have a one and a half year old german shepherd mix that has been an exception to the rule on everything I have tried in hoping to keep him out from chewing up things I don't want chewed in the backyard. Also, I have an issue of him trying to dig underneath our fence. I am looking for any tips that might work.

    Thus far I have tried lemon juice and coating things with vasoline and cayenne pepper. Apparently he loves the stuff.

    In regard to the fence problem, I have taken a two foot wide by 10 foot length of chicken wire (depending on the section of the fence I am dealing with) and stapled it to the bottom foot of the fence with the other foot laid under an inch or two of dirt. This was done on the advice that dogs don't like the feel of chicken wire. Well, apparently my dog loves to rip that crap apart then dig underneath it. Eventually, I will be putting concrete in much of the area that he likes to dig, but I really need to find a solution for the rest of the area.

  • #2
    I had a Chow Chow that refused to stop digging under the fence. I turned to red hot dry pepper and lined the fence perimeter. Didn't work, though he was red eyed and snotty about it. What worked for me was an electric fence. I take it though that your dogs mix is what making him so hard headed, as German shepherds are a very intelligent dog, receptive to their owner's commands. Just remember, if you use the electric collar and fence wire that you bury around the yard, you'll have to teach the dog not to like the shock. Walk him by the buried wire, when he begins receiving the jolt, walk him away from the wire. Otherwise, the dog will just sit on the wire receiving a good palpitation!

    I have used the electric wire and collar on other dogs too, a hard headed Rottweiler with great success. My later German Shepherd was much too intelligent to ignore my commands, never had a problem with that dog. What's difficult is breaking a dog from a bad habit, it is much better to nip it when it just starts to demonstrate behavior problems. Seriously, though, the electric fence and collar works well, and I don't think it cruel at all, especially compared to continually verbally scolding a dog which creates all kinds of behavioral issues.

    God bless,
    William
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    • #3
      Our dog is a German Shepherd/Rottweiler/Husky mix (as far as I know). He definitely has the features of the first two, and he also has one blue and one brown eye. He does seem pretty smart, though thankfully he has not figured out how to get out of his kennel. I do admit I need to get more diligent in actually training him. We did put him through an obedience course last year, which did help a little. I just need to get back to it and actually train him the way he needs to be. Problem is our kids don't really help as when they are outside playing with him they allow him to jump up on them, which is something I have tried to train him not to do. Not very well, obviously.
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      • #4
        The Husky, I'm willing to bet is responsible for the hard hardheadedness. I raised Hybrid Wolves in the past and used Malamutes and Huskies to breed with them in order to make them legal. Some of the dogs were as little as 60% wolf, and the others up to 97% wolf. Huskies want to run and work, if your area is too small that may be his calling. Wolves and Sled dogs run up to 30 square miles a day! Enclose them into a small spot and all they want to do is pace back and forth and run free. Though I do not know how those other breeds like the Rott will have an affect, which are usually slow runners and for a short distance.

        We had our wolves enclosed in a 12 foot tall kennel. And they were all successful climbing out of it. They would put their paws in the holes in the chain link, and climb to the top, then lifting a roof that sat ontop of it until they jumped down from 12 feet to run across 40 acres of Corn field.

        Wish you the best: Amazon.com: permiter

        God bless,
        William
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        • #5
          Hey have you found any good doggy treats that don't include ingredients that cause cancer? I just heard the ones we are using (milkbones) have just such an ingredient.

          Our dog has never tried climbing anything (thank God!) so that hasn't been a problem. Though there was once when my oldest sun let the mesh cover to the kennel hang too low and Jack (the dog) got a hold of it and ripped it to shreds. That was kind of a blessing in disguise as the mesh cover that came with the kennel never fully covered it. I found another one online that provides a much better cover, and I got some bungees to attach it, rather than the zipties they usually come with and end up becoming brittle after a few months.
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          • #6
            Originally posted by Knotical View Post
            Hey have you found any good doggy treats that don't include ingredients that cause cancer? I just heard the ones we are using (milkbones) have just such an ingredient.
            For my German Shepherd we would buy soup bones from the butcher or grocery store. Our freezer was packed full of bones for the dogs, they loved em. The more meat left on the soup bones the better, the dogs really try to get as much meat off the bone as possible before eating the entire bone. It really cleans their teeth. Just don't cook the bones, because it causes them to splinter.

            God bless,
            William
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