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New ‘Jesus-Centered Bible’ Highlights Old Testament Passages That Refer to Christ

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  • New ‘Jesus-Centered Bible’ Highlights Old Testament Passages That Refer to Christ

    Two editors have released a new version of the Bible in which they have highlighted all the passages in the Old Testament that refer to Christ.




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  • #2
    It sounds like this might be a very good Bible to own.
    Clyde Herrin's Blog
    Comment>

    • #3
      It's the New Living Translation, which I'd never spend money on. And, I think the task of identifying OT verses about Jesus is too big a job for anyone who would use the NLT. There are those verses which the NT explicitly connects to Christ, but there are thousands more that also connect to Christ, which I doubt the people behind this project have the wit or integrity to find. This "Jesus-Centered Bible" is just a money making ploy. Step 1) Use the color red for a few hundred OT verses. Step 2) Profit.

      Isaiah 65 New Living Translation
      9 I will preserve a remnant of the people of Israel and of Judah to possess my land. Those I choose will inherit it, and my servants will live there.

      That's about Jesus, but you'd never know it by the butchered job done by the NLT. And, I'm sure you'd never know it by that supposed Jesus-Centered Bible.

      Isaiah 65 King James Version
      9 And I will bring forth a seed out of Jacob, and out of Judah an inheritor of my mountains: and mine elect shall inherit it, and my servants shall dwell there.

      In a real Bible, you can see it refers to a seed out of Jacob. That seed is Jesus.
      Comment>

      • #4
        When it comes to bible translations, I find it most helpful to use a variety from both ends of the translation spectrum as well as those that fall in the middle.

        Translating from one language to another is no easy task, and because of the differences between languages, and even between language families, there are those words and phrases for which there are no real counterparts in the language something is being translated into. English and the ancient biblical languages are in different language families, so this problem exists in translating the scriptures. To deal with this problem, translators take various approaches - word for word which provides the most "literal" translation but which can obscure the meaning behind the words of the original language; thought for thought translations which try to convey the thought behind the original words into our modern language, but this presents a problem when the full thought and its nuances can't be captured in a few words, as well as giving more room for bias to affect the translation. Then there are those which fall somewhere in between trying to accommodate both approaches.

        I'll use the New Living Translation but along with others from various places along the continuum.
        Comment>

        • #5
          Originally posted by thereselittleflower View Post
          Translating from one language to another is no easy task, and because of the differences between languages, and even between language families, there are those words and phrases for which there are no real counterparts in the language something is being translated into.
          The word "seed" is very easy to translate. It can be kept "seed" (the direct translation) as in the KJV and LXX (the Bible the Apostles used). Fairly good translations use "offspring" to avoid forcing a plural (these same translations affirm the a single offspring with the reference to a single inheritor, in the same verse). Bad translations use "descendants", making a plural. But, "remnant" as found in the NLT is not a translation at all. It's an outright paraphrase, and one that retains the error of the bad translations, by making it a plural. The NLT goes even further in error and removes the lineal relationship of this seed to Abraham and Jacob, in the same verse.

          The context screams Jesus, but Jesus is excluded from the NLT. The NLT, from cover to cover, is a poor paraphrase. And, this so-called Jesus-Centered Bible fails at its one mission so spectacularly that I can know it fails without even opening the cover of one of those Bibles, based on the fact that it uses the NLT and boasts of less than 700 verses linked to Christ.

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