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Should Adulterous Pastors Be Restored?

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    #16
    Originally posted by tony View Post
    As for restoring adulterous pastors back I wouldn't like to give a direct answer. First after genuine repentance on the part of the pastor I would suggest he be placed on a long time, say months or years, of observation by senior pastors or clergy. His characters and Christian life should be properly monitored and checked before any further assignment.
    When Nathan confronted David with his sins of adultery and murder he admitted his guilt and Nathan immediately said that God had forgiven him. He didn't have to undergo a period of observation. Of course he still suffered the effects of the sin in the behavior of his children, and no doubt an adulterous pastor who was forgiven would still suffer the results of his actions.
    Clyde Herrin's Blog

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      #17
      Originally posted by theophilus View Post

      When Nathan confronted David with his sins of adultery and murder he admitted his guilt and Nathan immediately said that God had forgiven him. He didn't have to undergo a period of observation. Of course he still suffered the effects of the sin in the behavior of his children, and no doubt an adulterous pastor who was forgiven would still suffer the results of his actions.
      Noted, Thanks for the example I gave my opinion from a personal point of view or discretion. I have learned from your contribution would appreciate if there was a bible reference.

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        #18
        Originally posted by tony View Post

        Noted, Thanks for the example I gave my opinion from a personal point of view or discretion. I have learned from your contribution would appreciate if there was a bible reference.
        1 Timothy 3 The saying is trustworthy: If anyone aspires to the office of overseer, he desires a noble task. 2 Therefore an overseer[a] must be above reproach, the husband of one wife,[b] sober-minded, self-controlled, respectable, hospitable, able to teach, 3 not a drunkard, not violent but gentle, not quarrelsome, not a lover of money. 4 He must manage his own household well, with all dignity keeping his children submissive, 5 for if someone does not know how to manage his own household, how will he care for God's church? 6 He must not be a recent convert, or he may become puffed up with conceit and fall into the condemnation of the devil. 7 Moreover, he must be well thought of by outsiders, so that he may not fall into disgrace, into a snare of the devil.

        The emphasis is placed on this passage: Therefore an overseer[a] must be above reproach, the husband of one wife

        God bless,
        William

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          #19
          Last edited by birdfriend; 04-28-2017, 06:51 AM.

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            #20
            If an adulterous pastor has truly repented, would he truly want to be restored to a leadership position? If there was any chance that those in his flock might take the wrong lesson from it, that they can commit adultery and be forgiven and see it as tacit permission that thought should be enough to dissuade him. He would also have a genuine problem with his authority when dealing with parishoners who have transgressed, particularly younger ones. Since his crime was forgiven and he had no perceiveable consequences, why shouldn't someone embezzling from church funds get the same treatment? I could see taking the role perhaps temporarily until a replacement could be found, but the genuinely contrite should be trying to make sure people don't follow their example into sin.

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              #21
              Originally posted by ChatterBox View Post
              If an adulterous pastor has truly repented, would he truly want to be restored to a leadership position? ...but the genuinely contrite should be trying to make sure people don't follow their example into sin.

              Good question. It seems to me that if the pastor didn't want to leave and am guessing some wouldn't want to step down until forced to, then this is another mistake in judgement like getting into the adulterous relationship was in the first place. The key phrase you mention here is "genuinely contrite." Someone genuinely contrite would look to the common good; someone not genuinely contrite or in need of much help and counseling might not. Others may just consider the whole thing not so significant..like a fling, and not get serious about looking into their own motivations, behavior, weaknesses, etc. Or some in denial or feeling justified just think it won't happen again and so it doesn't matter that much. The genuinely contrite pastor will still have a heart for others.

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                #22
                According to 1 Timothy 3:7, this is one qualification for an pastor: "Moreover, he must be well thought of by outsiders, so that he may not fall into disgrace, into a snare of the devil." He might have been forgiven but if his past actions affect how outsiders see him it might be better for him to seek another form of service than being the pastor of a church.
                Clyde Herrin's Blog

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                  #23
                  Harrington, after his repentance in the 90s, blew into St. Louis like a hurricane. He got a number of local pastors to endorse him, bought daily time on a Christian radio station, and started crusading around Missouri and Illinois. He made grandiose promises, inviting a young woman at a rural Illinois church to come sing for him at a crusade in Washington DC. Not long after that, he came on the radio one day and announced without warning it would be his last day on the air and he was going back to New Orleans, no explanation given, and he was gone. Left me a bit skeptical as to how deep his restoration went.

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                    #24
                    In the last decade we have seen a number od Pastors in leadership position have moral failures. This has become a less serious flaw in liberal denominations that except LGBTQ persons in ministry. I use the term ministry in a very disgusting way. There is no "ministry" when a person lives in open sin.

                    We seen men who have failed morally back in ministry. But they seldom stay in a denomination that has put them on probation, as they will not abide by the restrictions placed on then to be restored. Jimmy Swaggart is one example of this.

                    Any church that does not abide by what Paul has written on the qualifications for a Elder, Pastor Deacon is sadly an unbiblical church, Those pastors or men in ministry are basically useless.

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