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If you could meet and converse with one theologian in Church history, who would it be?

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    If you could meet and converse with one theologian in Church history, who would it be?

    I thought this might be both a fun and stimulating hypothetical question. If you could sit down with and talk over theology with any theologian in church history, who would it be? For the sake of the discussion, it would not be a person who's words or actions were recorded in the Bible, but who came afterward (First century to the present).

    Who's your choice and why?

    #2
    Originally posted by Nahum View Post
    I thought this might be both a fun and stimulating hypothetical question. If you could sit down with and talk over theology with any theologian in church history, who would it be? For the sake of the discussion, it would not be a person who's words or actions were recorded in the Bible, but who came afterward (First century to the present).

    Who's your choice and why?
    Origen Knotical Bede Diego

    I'd like to talk to Martin Luther, and ask him what Scriptural evidence can he provide for the Perpetual Virginity of Mary? :D

    What about you Nahum? Who would you choose, and what question would you ask?

    God bless,
    William

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Nahum View Post
      I thought this might be both a fun and stimulating hypothetical question. If you could sit down with and talk over theology with any theologian in church history, who would it be? For the sake of the discussion, it would not be a person who's words or actions were recorded in the Bible, but who came afterward (First century to the present).

      Who's your choice and why?
      Who else, Origen! Origen was a brilliant man, a scholar, perhaps the first true Christian scholar. And the most important reason for me would be is his knowledge of the manuscripts and texts (both the Greek and Hebrew). A close runner up would be Jerome for the same reason.
      Last edited by Origen; 10-29-2016, 06:24 AM.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by William View Post

        Origen Knotical Bede Diego

        I'd like to talk to Martin Luther, and ask him what Scriptural evidence can he provide for the Perpetual Virginity of Mary? :D
        Brother, you crack me up :D

        Matthew 5
        16 Let your light shine before men in such a way that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father who is in heaven.

        Matthew 7
        12 However you want people to treat you, so treat them, for this is the Law and the Prophets.

        1 Corinthians 13
        1 If I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, but do not have love, I have become a noisy gong or a clanging cymbal.

        James 1
        19 Let everyone be quick to hear, slow to speak and slow to anger;
        20 for the anger of man does not achieve the righteousness of God.

        1 Peter 3
        15 Sanctify Christ as Lord in your hearts, always being ready to make a defense to everyone who asks you to give an account for the hope that is in you, yet with gentleness and reverence.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by William View Post

          Origen Knotical Bede Diego

          I'd like to talk to Martin Luther, and ask him what Scriptural evidence can he provide for the Perpetual Virginity of Mary? :D

          What about you Nahum? Who would you choose, and what question would you ask?

          God bless,
          William
          I would venture to guess that his response would be that it is what he learned as a Catholic and did not feel it necessary to dive into the validity of the doctrine over the others that he questioned. From my understanding of Luther he did hold onto many of the Catholic doctrines even after posting his theses. Quite frankly his actions were just the beginning of the bigger reformation which Calvin, Knox and others built upon. This is why we can't hold everything these gentlemen commented on as gospel. Sure we can glean some wisdom from what they wrote, but as we know from our own studies of the word their views were developed over time, and each of their successors built on what they learned from their predecessors.

          Comment


            #6
            There are a few questions I would ask Origen simply because I am curious. Eusebius claimed that Origen castrated himself.

            Question 1: Did you really castrate yourself? If "yes," then

            Question 2: Did you do it because of Matthew 19:12, or Matthew 18:8, or some other passage? If "yes," then

            Question 3: Were you not heavily into the allegorical method of interpretation and even promoted it? If "yes," then

            Question 4: Then why, in this case, would you take such a painfully literal interpretation of a passage? "Duh??? Oops!"

            Comment


              #7
              For me it would be Pope John ( don't recall which number) that was two Pope's ago. Believe he was Polish. Anyway he struck me as a very holy, kind, knowledgeable man. Of him I would ask, " what led u to God, and do u truly believe u are Peter on Earth?

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Believer View Post
                For me it would be Pope John ( don't recall which number) that was two Pope's ago. Believe he was Polish. Anyway he struck me as a very holy, kind, knowledgeable man. Of him I would ask, " what led u to God, and do u truly believe u are Peter on Earth?
                That would be John Paul II.

                Comment


                  #9
                  I would speak with Luther as well and learn from him what he felt were the essential elements of the faith. As well as what he felt about the fallen nature of the church today and the way it has failed to hold up to the high moral standard that it once stalwartly defended.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Polycarp

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I would like to sit down and talk with William Wilberforce. (Although it would be helpful if either he spoke in "modern" English, or I spoke in "old fashioned" English)

                      I guess the next best thing is reading his book, though, that is written in the aforementioned "old fashioned" English. As such, it is taking me awhile to work my way through it.

                      Comment

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