Discuss science topics such as creation and evolution and how they relate to Christianity.

Did Jesus Say He Created in Six Literal Days?

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  • Did Jesus Say He Created in Six Literal Days?

    by Ken Ham


    A very important question we must ask is, “What was Jesus’ view of the days of creation? Did He say that He created in six literal days?”

    When confronted with such a question, most Christians would automatically go to the New Testament to read the recorded words of Jesus to see if such a statement occurs.

    We see that Jesus clearly taught that the creation was young, for Adam and Eve existed “from the beginning,” not billions of years after the universe and earth came into existence.

    Now, when we search the New Testament Scriptures, we certainly find many interesting statements Jesus made that relate to this issue. Mark 10:6 says, “But from the beginning of the creation, God ‘made them male and female.’” From this passage, we see that Jesus clearly taught that the creation was young, for Adam and Eve existed “from the beginning,” not billions of years after the universe and earth came into existence. Jesus made a similar statement in Mark 13:19 indicating that man’s sufferings started very near the beginning of creation. The parallel phrases of “from the foundation of the world” and “from the blood of Abel” in Luke 11:50–51 also indicate that Jesus placed Abel very close to the beginning of creation, not billions of years after the beginning. His Jewish listeners would have assumed this meaning in Jesus’ words, for the first-century Jewish historian Josephus indicates that the Jews of his day believed that both the first day of creation and Adam’s creation were about 5,000 years before Christ.1

    In John 5:45–47, Jesus says, “Do not think that I shall accuse you to the Father; there is one who accuses you—Moses, in whom you trust. For if you believed Moses, you would believe Me; for he wrote about Me. But if you do not believe his writings, how will you believe My words?” In this passage, Jesus makes it clear that one must believe what Moses wrote. And one of the passages in the writings of Moses in Exodus 20:11 states: “For in six days the Lord made the heavens and the earth, the sea, and all that is in them, and rested the seventh day. Therefore the Lord blessed the Sabbath day and hallowed it.” This, of course, is the basis for our seven-day week—six days of work and one day of rest. Obviously, this passage was meant to be taken as speaking of a total of seven literal days based on the Creation Week of six literal days of work and one literal day of rest.

    In fact, in Luke 13:14, in his response to Jesus healing a person on the Sabbath, the ruler of the synagogue, who knew the law of Moses, obviously referred to this passage when he said, “There are six days on which men ought to work; therefore come and be healed on them, and not on the Sabbath day.” The sabbath day here was considered an ordinary day, and the six days of work were considered ordinary days. This teaching is based on the Law of Moses as recorded in Exodus 20, where we find the Ten Commandments—the six-day Creation Week being the basis for the Fourth Commandment.[The shepherd that missed out]We should also note the way Jesus treated as historical fact the accounts in the Old Testament, which religious and atheistic skeptics think are unbelievable mythology. These historical accounts include Adam and Eve as the first married couple (Matthew 19:3–6; Mark 10:3–9), Abel as the first prophet who was killed (Luke 11:50–51), Noah and the Flood (Matthew 24:38–39), Moses and the serpent in the wilderness (John 3:14), Moses and the manna from heaven to feed the Israelites in the wilderness (John 6:32–33, 49), the experiences of Lot and his wife (Luke 17:28–32), the judgment of Sodom and Gomorrah (Matthew 10:15), the miracles of Elijah (Luke 4:25–27), and Jonah and the big fish (Matthew 12:40–41). As New Testament scholar John Wenham has compellingly argued, Jesus did not allegorize these accounts but took them as straightforward history, describing events that actually happened just as the Old Testament describes.2 Jesus used these accounts to teach His disciples that the events of His death, Resurrection, and Second Coming would likewise certainly happen in time-space reality.

    These passages taken together strongly imply that Jesus took Genesis 1 as literal history describing creation in six 24-hour days. But are there any more explicit passages?

    I believe there are. However, one has to approach this issue in a slightly different manner. We are not limited to the New Testament when we try to find out if Jesus stated He created in six days; we can also search the Old Testament. After all, Jesus is the Second Person of the Trinity and therefore has always existed.

    First, Colossians makes it clear that Jesus Christ, the Son of God, was the one who created all things: “For by Him all things were created that are in heaven and that are on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or principalities or powers. All things were created through Him and for Him. And He is before all things, and in Him all things consist” (Colossians 1:16–17).

    We are also told elsewhere in Scripture how Jesus created: “By the word of the Lord the heavens were made, And all the host of them by the breath of His mouth. For He spoke, and it was done; He commanded, and it stood fast” (Psalm 33:6-9). We see the meaning of this when we consider the miracles of Jesus during His earthly ministry. All the miracles occurred instantly—at His Word. He instantly turned water into wine in His very first miracle, which “revealed His glory” as the Creator (John 2:1–11; John 1:1–3, 14, 18). It was the instant calming of the wind and the waves that convinced His disciples that He was no mere man. So it was with all His miracles (Mark 4:35–41). He did not speak and wait for days, weeks, months, or years for things to happen. He spoke and it was done. So, when He said, “Let there be . . .” in Genesis 1, it did not take long ages for things to come into existence.

    We also know that Jesus is in fact called the Word: “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things were made through Him, and without Him nothing was made that was made” (John 1:1–3).

    Jesus, who is the Word, created everything by simply speaking things into existence.

    Yes, Jesus did explicitly say He created in six days.

    Now, consider Exodus 20:1: “And God spoke all these words, saying . . . .” Because Jesus is the Word, this must be a reference to the preincarnate Christ speaking to Moses. As we know, there are a number of appearances of Christ (theophanies) in the Old Testament. John 1:18 states: “No one has seen God at any time. The only begotten Son, who is in the bosom of the Father, He has declared Him.” There is no doubt, with rare exception, that the preincarnate Christ did the speaking to Adam, Noah, the patriarchs, Moses, etc. Now, when the Creator God spoke as recorded in Exodus 20:1, what did He (Jesus) say? As we read on, we find this statement: “For in six days the Lord made the heavens and the earth, the sea, and all that is in them, and rested the seventh day” (Exodus 20:11).

    Yes, Jesus did explicitly say He created in six days.3 Not only this, but the one who spoke the words “six days” also wrote them down for Moses: “Then the Lord delivered to me two tablets of stone written with the finger of God, and on them were all the words which the Lord had spoken to you on the mountain from the midst of the fire in the day of the assembly” (Deuteronomy 9:10).

    Jesus said clearly that He created in six days. And He even did something He didn’t do with most of Scripture—He wrote it down Himself. How clearer and more authoritative can you get than that?

  • #2
    Yes Jesus did say six literal days, the day/age theory has too many holes in it and the word used in the bible in Genesis for day is found throughout the bible meaning one literal 24 hour period from sunset to sunset (and the evening and the morning.....), and the Earth is @6000 years old.

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    • #3
      The re-molding of the earth took six days but there are many who believe there's a gap in time between the first verse of the bible [when the entire Universe was created] and afterwards destroyed when Satan and his angels rebelled against God. Prior to the re-molding of the earth Satan lived on the "shattered" earth which is how he happened to be in Eden when Adam was created. Repopulating the earth took six literal days but the earth had been in existence before.
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      • #4
        I've never heard that interpretation Smithee. I know that some people try to bend the 6 days into meaning something else, but I truly believe that it was just that. As far as the shattered earth theory I never heard of that. I know that the Garden of Eden was completely hidden from man after Adam and Eve were cast out.
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        • #5
          Well God did, and yes, scriptures say He did it in 6 days and rested on the 7th. But is His one day equivalent to OUR one day? What if his one day is equivalent to a million human years? Makes more sense like that, right?
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          • #6
            Originally posted by OursIsTheFury View Post
            What if his one day is equivalent to a million human years?
            Each day included a period of light and one of darkness and consisted of an evening and a morning.
            God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And there was evening and there was morning, the first day.
            (Genesis 1:5 ESV)
            How could this possibly be equivalent to a million human years?
            Clyde Herrin's Blog
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            • #7
              The Bible says that creation was made in 6 days. Some have interpreted the six days as being hypothetical based upon several verses in Psalms (and in 2 Peter 3:8) where it says that "with the Lord a day is like a thousand years, and a thousand years are like a day." So some have tried to say that the days are not literal. But the fact that Moses and Jesus think that Adam and Eve are literal people debunks this myth.

              Second, the word used for day can be interpreted as having longer than a 24-hour period; and hebrew has several words to use to describe day. But the one used in Genesis is the only one that can be interpreted as a literal 24-hour day. I can go into more detail once I find my Genesis notes from college.....
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              • #8
                GINOLJC, interesting discussion. personally I don't believe in a literal 24hr day in creation. for a few things. #1 the earth must be rotating, and the sun shining on it to get a 24hr day or solar day. big problem, the sun did not shine until day 4. #2. Genesis 2:4 "These are the generations of the heavens and of the earth when they were created, in the day that the LORD God made the earth and the heaven". Generation with an "s" at the end is not ONE day. for the scripture states "These are the generations" if 6 literal days are generations, them we missed a lot.
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                • #9
                  Originally posted by G101 View Post
                  hese are the generations of the heavens and of the earth
                  Arguing this solely off of one translation isn't very good since one translation can err, only the original languages are perfect. So you argue this based on 'generations' as it appears in the ESV. The NIV ('84) lists it as "this is the account of." More often than not, it has been rendered into english as "the account" "this is how" "the history"--and that's just simply comparing translations. Ultimately, it requires an accurate rendering of towledah in the account.

                  If you are arguing for a longer period of time, you run into issues as well. How do you deal with the renderings of night and day, time stamps so to speak, on the creation process?
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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by bigleague15 View Post
                    If you are arguing for a longer period of time, you run into issues as well. How do you deal with the renderings of night and day, time stamps so to speak, on the creation process?
                    the night and day issue for me is LIGHT, DAY is understanding, and DARKNESS, NIGHT is ignorance, the unknown). if I say walk in the light is that daylight or understanding?.
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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by G101 View Post
                      the night and day issue for me is LIGHT, DAY is understanding, and DARKNESS, NIGHT is ignorance, the unknown). if I say walk in the light is that daylight or understanding?
                      Why then, is the mantra "there was evening and there was morning--the _____ day" repeated throughout the account in Genesis 1. Context does not indicate (at all) that the night must be ignorance and the day understanding. That's a very archetypal literary criticism of the passage, and it's taken out of context.

                      At the end of each creation, God himself says it is "good" and when man is created, it is "very good." It is perfect. Sin has not entered the world yet. So how does ignorance fit into that? I'm curious to hear how you will argue this.
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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by bigleague15 View Post
                        Why then, is the mantra "there was evening and there was morning--the _____ day" repeated throughout the account in Genesis
                        UNDERSTAND the first thing I did. and i created visible, and invisible, which you do not understand, ignorance. DAY ONE , UNDERSTAND the second thing I did. and i created visible, and invisible, which you do not understand, ignorance. DAY TWO....... ect. see, Light is the source, or medium for data transfer, or exchange.
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                        • #13
                          The days of creation were literal days but they might not have been exactly 24 hours long.

                          How long were the days? | clydeherrin
                          Clyde Herrin's Blog
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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by G101 View Post
                            UNDERSTAND the first thing I did. and i created visible, and invisible, which you do not understand, ignorance. DAY ONE , UNDERSTAND the second thing I did. and i created visible, and invisible, which you do not understand, ignorance. DAY TWO....... ect. see, Light is the source, or medium for data transfer, or exchange.
                            What complete nonsense. Moreover you did not answer bigleague15 question. Why then, is the mantra "there was evening and there was morning--the _____ day" repeated throughout the account in Genesis?

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by G101 View Post
                              UNDERSTAND the first thing I did. and i created visible, and invisible, which you do not understand, ignorance. DAY ONE , UNDERSTAND the second thing I did. and i created visible, and invisible, which you do not understand, ignorance. DAY TWO....... ect. see, Light is the source, or medium for data transfer, or exchange.
                              That's a lot of thinking there G101 but it doesn't pass the languages test.
                              The Aramaic language is pretty user specific so it's pretty hard to rationalize the intention of the words. There are only 2 types of "light", one of which is literal illumination, not figurative while the other simply means "unsubstantial' such as a loaf of bread being light as compared to other loaves.
                              Another example of the specificity of Hebrew is the word "yom" which is literally a day with a shared period of daytime and night time or around 24 hours.

                              That said, in Koine Greek we have the figurative employed in several places such as in the 1st chapter of John where we have, "and the light shineth in the darkness, but the darkness comprehendeth it not. [Clearly] John was talking about spiritual illumination rather than the light from an artificial God made or man made source such as the sun or a candle.

                              There are so many things in the Bible which we as humans simply must make more difficult that it really is. With an ample spacing of IQ's in the world, why do we think that God would want to make His Word so difficult that only philosophers with an IQ over 120 can understand Him?

                              Last edited by Bobby Cole; 05-24-2016, 07:59 AM.
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