Discuss science topics such as creation and evolution and how they relate to Christianity.

Physics and Proof of the Afterlife

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  • Physics and Proof of the Afterlife

    Some newer discoveries in physics like anti-matter, parallel universes and the like might give more support to the idea of a supernatural world as described in the Bible. In other words, all we see, may not be all that's there. However, of course, non-religious people skeptical about the idea. Do you all see a connection between a world beyond the three dimensions and physics?

  • #2
    Originally posted by Jason76 View Post
    Some newer discoveries in physics like anti-matter, parallel universes and the like might give more support to the idea of a supernatural world as described in the Bible. In other words, all we see, may not be all that's there. However, of course non-religious people skeptical about the idea. Do you all see a connection between a world beyond the three dimensions and Physics?
    Notice the words 'might' 'may' 'likely', 'if', 'plausible', 'suggests', and 'could well'. Hence the reason those scientists are called 'theoretical physicists'.

    God bless,
    William
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    • #3
      Physics can also be used to bring honor and glory to the Saviour God, to His Son Jesus Christ the Lamb, and to His Anointing Holy Spirit. Our God receives full glory here whenever He is credited through physics and science. We should not come to expect any less either.
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      • #4
        I believe that human beings are not just a body, they are more than that. Human beings are mind and matter. Mind refers to consciousness and matter is the physical body. Death is just the end of matter, however, mind remains for ever. You call it soul or self, if you like. When person dies, his soul will escape his body and will be born as another human being. This theory is largely based in the Hindu philosophy of life and afterlife. In Buddhism also, the karma principle explais after life.
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        • #5
          Originally posted by William View Post

          Notice the words 'might' 'may' 'likely', 'if', 'plausible', 'suggests', and 'could well'. Hence the reason those scientists are called 'theoretical physicists'.

          God bless,
          William
          A respectful and friendly chuckle.....

          IMO, the "war" that at times exists between a tiny few in the world of biology and Christian fundamentalism largely doesn't exist among those in the physical sciences (well, it does in geology). Indeed, some in theoretical physics at times wax rather theological (although it's more apt to sound Hindu than Christian).

          I suppose one important point where theoretical physics and Christian theology interplay is the affirmation that what's real can be.... weird, not at all to be confused with how we humans tend to "view" it. Yup, with string theory, etc. - concepts of divine, heaven, etc. are not so incredible. But that's shouldn't be confused with affirming or endorsing or agreeing - only not dismissing.

          Way back in Physics 101, I had a prof who said: "Physics all makes perfect sense - until you get to the edges, then it gets incredibly weird." The realization that things can be, well, weird perhaps alone makes Physics less dismissive of religion. And of course, Christian fundamentalists have not declared war on Physics (yet) so there is not the defensiveness that might exist elsewhere (my sister has her Ph.D. in biology).

          For ME, I keep physics and theology very much apart. That's might be rebuked.... that might be purely pragmatic.... but I accept them as both quests to understand what is probably - at least in any full sense - ununderstandable (pardon - I'm not opposed to inventing words). ONE on the things that drew me to Lutheranism was the generous, liberal, frequent use of the word "MYSTERY" and a humility as we bow before the Cross, the Word, history.... A humility to say, "this seems true.... that seems true..... and we just don't know how it cranks out, how the dots connect (if they do at all).... GOD knows - and that's good enough." The more I learned in physics, the more ENORMOUS it became that we know very, very little.... and the only way to learn is to realize we don't know it all. Humility..... community..... accountability.... those are foundational themes for me in the process of theology; mystery a word I gladly embrace and use. And yes, I think my studies of physics make that attitude, that willingness, that approach more acceptable and appropriate to me.


          That's just my half cent.

          Looking forward to finding something to dig into here at this site....

          A blessed Epiphany to all

          - Josiah


          PS FYI, I have an unshakable rule for myself - I don't discuss science in any but the very, very broadest terms at Christian websites (and vise versa). What I've said here is about the extend. I don't come as an authority on anything (well, maybe Scotch). I learned a lot about Catholicism in my Catholic days - and I may share that - but I can only share what I learned. And I've learned a lot about Lutheranism (read much, too) but I'm no Th.D. in Lutheran dogmatics (perhaps someone here is). I'm just a sinful bloat who is often wrong (except when it comes to Scotch and maybe baseball) - just ask my wife.




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          • #6
            There is an afterlife if you believe in it. If you have faith that humans should do good deeds and it is your deeds that ultimately lead you to happiness or suffering then you believe that there is an afterlife.

            Karma is the concept on which Afterlife is based on. So if you believe in "Be not deceived; God is not mocked: for whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap" then you are automatically believing in Afterlife regardless of what religion or faith you folow.
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            • #7
              Originally posted by Decentlady View Post
              There is an afterlife if you believe in it.
              What if you don't believe in an after life? Does that mean there isn't one? The existence or non existence of an after life doesn't depend on what you believe. Your personal experience of the after life does depend on your beliefs.
              Clyde Herrin's Blog
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              • #8
                Originally posted by Decentlady View Post
                There is an afterlife if you believe in it. If you have faith that humans should do good deeds and it is your deeds that ultimately lead you to happiness or suffering then you believe that there is an afterlife.

                Karma is the concept on which Afterlife is based on. So if you believe in "Be not deceived; God is not mocked: for whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap" then you are automatically believing in Afterlife regardless of what religion or faith you folow.
                Hi DL, "Karma" is not a Christian concept, nor can it be harmonized with Christianity. Outside of the fact that Christianity teaches that we die "once" (i.e. Hebrews 9:27), we also teach/believe that Heaven is reached not on the basis of what we "do", but solely on the basis what Jesus did on our behalf (His righteous life and His death), and in God's gracious and merciful promise to save us through faith on that basis .. alone .. i.e. Ephesians 2:8-9.

                So it is not dependent upon us living multiple lives to try to pay for our past sinful acts and "do better" in our present life, rather, the penalty for the sins of God's saints was paid for in full by the death of Jesus on the Cross.

                I hope that made sense. If it didn't, please tell me and I'll try again.

                Yours in Christ,
                David
                p.s. - there is a sense of "sowing and reaping" in Christianity in that the reprobate justly receives what he/she "deserves/worked for" in this life ("The wages of sin is death....." i.e. Romans 6:23), but saints, whose works deserve the same "wage" as the reprobate, receive what Jesus deserves instead :) (i.e. John 3:16; John 3:18; John 5:24; John 20:31; Romans 10:9-10; Titus 3:5; 1 John 5:11-13)




                "To the one who does not work, but believes in
                Him who justifies the wicked, his faith
                is credited as righteousness"

                Romans 4:5
                Last edited by David Lee; 01-21-2017, 09:38 PM.
                Simul Justus et Peccator ~Martin Luther

                "We are justified by faith alone, but the faith that justifies is never alone" ~John Calvin

                "The Christian does not think God will love us because we are good, but that God will make us good because He loves us." ~C. S. Lewis

                "The secret is Christ in me, not me in a different set of circumstances" ~Elisabeth Elliot

                "The law is for the self-righteous to humble their pride; the Gospel is for the lost to remove their despair. ~C. H. Spurgeon
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                • #9
                  If Karma is true then why give to charity? Wouldn't people be receiving a Just sentence for what they've done?

                  God bless,
                  William
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                  • #10
                    Do I think it is surprising God could shape a universe that is too complicated for us to understand? Not really. At our current stage of development I don't think we can prove the existance of any of this, just a likelihood. While it may be mathematically proveable, practical proof is another matter and science advances so fast that who knows what the prevailing ideas will be in a few years.

                    Originally posted by William View Post
                    If Karma is true then why give to charity? Wouldn't people be receiving a Just sentence for what they've done?

                    God bless,
                    William
                    I've seen the idea of karma used to excuse some awful and uncharitable behaviour. So many Western takes on it seem to view it as an excuse for some awfully uncharitable acts, because obviously, if someone is poor or suffering they deserve it and therefore should not be helped. They always neglect the part of the Buddhist faith where a truly holy soul may select incarnation in an awful life to purify themselves and to test and guide others...

                    To quote a better writer "Wouldn't it be horrible if life was fair, and we really deserved all the horrible things that happened to us?"
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