Matthew 28:1-4, first in the series, Accepted New Testament English translation of Scriptures ...

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  • Matthew 28:1-4, first in the series, Accepted New Testament English translation of Scriptures ...

    Accepted New Testament English translation of Scriptures ostensibly improved in the 20th century, exposed by Gerhard Ebersöhn

    ...word for word as they occur and recur in exegetical and doctrinal disputations...

    1. Matthew 28:1-4, word, Greek, 'opse'- "late"

    For an introduction and more or less to set the tone...
    Conversation...

    Sonny:
    "Jesus" is used in Hebrews 13 times, meaning, Jesus and 1 time meaning Joshua.

    If that verse, 4:8, is speaking of the Lord Jesus Christ then Christ was a failure in that he failed to give them rest.

    It obviously speaks of Joshua, who led the people into the promised land. In fact the Syriac version adds, "the son of Nun."


    Savvy:
    Re:
    <<13 times meaning Jesus and 1 time meaning Joshua.>> If you say so, it's your opinion, incorrect 13 to 1.
    Re:
    <<If that verse is speaking of the Lord Jesus Christ then Christ was a failure in that he failed to give them rest.>>
    Absolutely so! But was Christ a failure in that he failed to give them rest? The writer does not think so, because he a priori declared that "Jesus" --not Joshua-- "GAVE them Rest".
    But Hebrews 4 is not our Scripture now.

    Sonny:
    Ὀψὲ (after) δὲσαββάτων (the sabbath) . . . Ὀψὲ after the close of the day. From
    ὄπίσω: after, back, behind.
    Tyndale (1534): which dawneth the morrowe after the Sabboth . . .
    Geneva (1560): when the first day of the weeke began to dawn . . .

    Savvy:
    Matthew 28(:1)— The New Testament first translated in English from the original tongue by "martyr" William Tyndale 1525 - 1526 printed in 1526 by Peter Schoeffer in the German city of Worms.
    The Sabboth daye at even which dauneth the morowe after the Sabboth Mary Magdalene and the other Mary came to se the sepulcre

    1534 W.T. edition with variants, Miles Coverdale 1535, "martyr" John Rogers Mathew's Bible 1537, "martyr" Thomas Cranmer Great Bible 1539...
    "Upon the evening of the Sabbath holy day which dawneth the morrowe of the first day of the Sabbaths"

    Not your, Sonny’s, clip, <<which dawneth the morrowe>>, but Tyndale’s complete added English variant, reading, "Upon the evening of the Sabbath holy day which dawneth the morowe of the first day of the Sabbaths".

    The 1534 "evening" = the 1526 "even"
    = the 1611KJV, DRB 1899 et al “In the end of the Sabbath
    = DBT1890, ASV1901[*] “Now late on the sabbath day, as it began to dawn toward the first day of the week” / “Now late on sabbath, as it was the dusk of the next day after sabbath
    = the Greek -100 AD, “LATE Sabbath mid-afternoon before the First Day of the week”.

    Therefore:
    The 1534 “evening of the Sabbath holy day”—“the Sabbath holy day’s evening” = the 1526 “The Sabboth daye at even which dauneth the morowe of the first day of the Sabbaths

    [*Revised Standard Version 1901, 1971, the Amplified Bible, 1965, the New American Standard Bible, 1995, and the Recovery Version, 1999 "the Sabbath"]

    And so, Sonny's, <<Ὀψὲ (after) δὲ σαββάτων (the sabbath) . . . Ὀψὲ after the close of the day. From ὄπίσω: after, back, behind.>> is quite amusingly off the mark.
    NO precedential incidence of ‘opse’ meaning <after> exists in all of Greek literature anywhere at any time before ‘late Greek’ e.g., in Philostratus’ use of ‘opse’ with the Ablative, in an ‘Ablative sense’ of ‘time left over at the end of or after’ an event.
    <<Ὀψὲ (after)>> is a novel, Sunday sacredness propagandistic invention. Because ‘oψὲ’ having always been an Adverb of time—of ‘late time’—, has ever so consistently meant “in the end or ending hours / months / years” of time-periods like days and seasons and eras… <<the close of the day>> if you will, thank you. From ‘heh opis’ – pay, end-wage (respect for old age); Adjective, ‘opsios’-late; ‘opsidzoh’-come late, go late; ‘opsigonos’-born in old age. ‘opsimos’ poetic for ‘opse’-late, slow tardy.

    ‘Opisthen/opithe’-opposite to ‘prosthe’-in front; ‘remaining (books)’; ‘to/ta opisthen’-hinder parts, rear, back; ‘opsithios skelea’-hind legs.

    ‘Opse’ therefore does not come from <<ὄπίσω: after, back, behind>> which is beyond description inventiveness. ‘Opse’ NEVER means ‘after’ or a day <back>. ‘Opse’ ALWAYS means “late on the current day before the day after (it)”, in other words, “on the current day—on the Sabbath—LATE before the First Day”.
    Last edited by Gerhard Ebersöhn; 01-16-2017, 10:49 AM.
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