Poll Question: Noah and The Flood

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  • Poll Question: Noah and The Flood

    What is your view concerning the flood? Please feel free to add comments on the topic.
    11
    World Wide Flood
    81.82%
    9
    Local Flood
    18.18%
    2
    No Flood, story not meant to be taken literally
    0%
    0

  • #2
    Looks like I'm the only heretic. ;)
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    • #3
      There is plenty of evidence to suggest a world wide flood.
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      • #4
        Originally posted by thatbrian View Post
        Looks like I'm the only heretic.
        I still love you. :)
        This doesn't even come close to being an issue to break fellowship over.
        Frankly, it would not surprise me at all to get to heaven and have Moses say "Guy's it was metaphorical." Then a billion fundamentalists will all slap our foreheads as we gain comprehension at the same time and say "Ooohhh."

        I am just never comfortable betting against the literal interpretation of scripture, so I err on the side of 6 literal days of creation and a literal world-wide flood.
        (I just keep both out of the path of essential sotierology).
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        • #5
          If the account of the flood were meant to be metaphorical what would the purpose of having Noah build the ark in the first place if he was not to load it with animals in anticipation of a devastating flood?
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          • #6
            Originally posted by Knotical View Post
            If the account of the flood were meant to be metaphorical what would the purpose of having Noah build the ark in the first place if he was not to load it with animals in anticipation of a devastating flood?
            Let me turn the question around.
            If someone somehow PROVES that there was no whole earth flood, will that make the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, just another ancient myth, like Brahma or Zeus or Odin?

            To answer directly:
            IF THE FLOOD WAS METAPHORICAL (this is a huge and unproven 'if' that I do not believe is true, but am simply entertaining as a 'what if'), then the whole story is metaphorical. Noah never built an ark, there were no animals on the ark, the life expectancy before the flood vs after, the first rainbow, all of it is metaphorical.

            Like the story of the 'prodigal son'. The veracity of the story is not essential to understand the point Jesus was attempting to communicate by the story.

            So look at the story of the flood and what message is there for YOU irrespective of whether it was a world-wide flood, a local flood, or a hypothetical flood.
            1. Even in a world of complete evil, God will see (and retain) a righteous Remanent.
            2. God will make provision for His People and the continuation of his plan no matter what.
            3. God will warn evil men of their impending doom; the righteous men will be the instrument that warns them.
            4. When the time for judgement comes, it is the hand of God that will both protect the righteous and destroy the evil.
            5. There is nowhere evil can hide to escape the judgement of God.
            6. After delivering his Remanent safely through judgement, God will erect an eternal 'Ebeneezer' visible to all men to remind us who he is and what he has done ... to both the righteous and the wicked.
            7. Every time you see the rainbow, remember the story of Noah and God.
            8. It also foreshadows the coming Christ.
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            • #7
              The real question is: what would be the point of the account if it were metaphorical?
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              • #8
                Here we go. . .
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                • #9
                  Originally posted by atpollard View Post
                  I still love you. :)
                  This doesn't even come close to being an issue to break fellowship over.
                  Frankly, it would not surprise me at all to get to heaven and have Moses say "Guy's it was metaphorical." Then a billion fundamentalists will all slap our foreheads as we gain comprehension at the same time and say "Ooohhh."

                  I am just never comfortable betting against the literal interpretation of scripture, so I err on the side of 6 literal days of creation and a literal world-wide flood.
                  (I just keep both out of the path of essential sotierology).

                  I belive that the flood was local/regional, but I wouldn't want to die on that hill.

                  If it was local, the storyline can remain unchanged. It's just the meaning of the word, "world" that is in question. Just like the word, "all" is frequently mistaken by many Arminians.
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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Knotical View Post
                    The real question is: what would be the point of the account if it were metaphorical?
                    Same as its point if it is literal.
                    It teaches about remanent and judgement and destruction and deliverance ... foreshadowing both Christ's work of redemption, and the judgement of the End of the Age.

                    Is it essential to your salvation that it never rained before the flood?
                    Is this a hill to die on?

                    [Mind you, I believe in a literal world-wide flood. I just do not see it as essential to salvation.]
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                    • #11
                      There is evidence that the flood was worldwide in the fossils that are found in all parts of the world. Most of them were caused by the flood. The belief that they are formed over millions of years was originated by scientists who didn't believe in the flood and so had to find some other explanation to account for them. Unfortunately their opinions are now such an established part of our culture that a lot of Christians who believe the Bible accept them as true.
                      Clyde Herrin's Blog
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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by thatbrian View Post


                        I belive that the flood was local/regional, but I wouldn't want to die on that hill.
                        May I ask what causes you to think this? I was taught that it was the whole world.

                        I'm not sure how that lines up with God's promise about never flooding (the "world") again. We do still have devastating floods, but not world wide. He isn't breaking His promise, so... how does that work?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by thatbrian View Post


                          I belive that the flood was local/regional, but I wouldn't want to die on that hill.

                          If it was local, the storyline can remain unchanged. It's just the meaning of the word, "world" that is in question. Just like the word, "all" is frequently mistaken by many Arminians.
                          The math just does not add up for a local flood, considering the rain fell for 40 days and 40 nights. In addition, the bible says, the springs were opened up as well. There was enough water to completely submerge entire mountain ranges, which would make a local flood impossible.
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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Knotical View Post

                            The math just does not add up for a local flood, considering the rain fell for 40 days and 40 nights. In addition, the bible says, the springs were opened up as well. There was enough water to completely submerge entire mountain ranges, which would make a local flood impossible.
                            What math? You didn't provide any math.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by thatbrian View Post

                              What math? You didn't provide any math.
                              Trillions of gallons of water.
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